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dc.contributor.authorMargo, Robert A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-25T17:45:35Z
dc.date.available2019-03-25T17:45:35Z
dc.date.issued2018-09
dc.identifier.citationRobert A Margo. 2018. "The integration of economic history into economics." Cliometrica, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp. 377 - 406. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11698-018-0170-8
dc.identifier.issn1863-2505
dc.identifier.issn1863-2513
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34360
dc.description.abstractIn the USA today the academic field of economic history is much closer to economics than it is to history in terms of professional behavior, a stylized fact that I call the “integration of economic history into economics.” I document this using two types of evidence—use of econometric language in articles appearing in academic journals of economic history and economics; and publication histories of successive cohorts of Ph.D.s in the first decade since receiving the doctorate. Over time, economic history became more like economics in its use of econometrics and in the likelihood of scholars publishing in economics, as opposed to, say, economic history journals. But the pace of change was slower in economic history than in labor economics, another subfield of economics that underwent profound intellectual change in the 1950s and 1960s, and there was also a structural break evident for post-2000 Ph.D. cohorts. To account for these features of the data, I sketch a simple, overlapping generations model of the academic labor market in which junior scholars have to convince senior scholars of the merits of their work in order to gain tenure. I argue that the early cliometricians—most notably, Robert Fogel and Douglass North—conceived of a scholarly identity for economic history that kept the field distinct from economics proper in various ways, until after 2000 when their influence had waned.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 377 - 406en_US
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Nature America, Incen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCliometrica
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectArts & humanitiesen_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectHistory of social sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBusiness & economicsen_US
dc.subjectEconomic historyen_US
dc.subjectIntegrationen_US
dc.subjectLabor economicsen_US
dc.subjectEconometricsen_US
dc.subjectOverlapping generationsen_US
dc.subjectScholarly identityen_US
dc.subjectPhilosophy and religious studiesen_US
dc.titleThe integration of economic history into economicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11698-018-0170-8
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Economicsen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.date.online2018-01-25


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