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dc.contributor.authorPutcha, Deeptien_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Robert S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCronin-Golomb, Aliceen_US
dc.contributor.authorJanes, Amy C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStern, Chantal E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-01T14:24:34Z
dc.date.available2019-04-01T14:24:34Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationD Putcha, RS Ross, A Cronin-Golomb, AC Janes, CE Stern. 2016. "Salience and default mode network coupling predicts cognition in aging and Parkinson’s disease." Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp. 205 - 215. https://doi.org/10.1017/s1355617715000892
dc.identifier.issn1355-6177
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34387
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Cognitive impairment is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Three neurocognitive networks support efficient cognition: the salience network, the default mode network, and the central executive network. The salience network is thought to switch between activating and deactivating the default mode and central executive networks. Anti-correlated interactions between the salience and default mode networks in particular are necessary for efficient cognition. Our previous work demonstrated altered functional coupling between the neurocognitive networks in non-demented individuals with PD compared to age-matched control participants. Here, we aim to identify associations between cognition and functional coupling between these neurocognitive networks in the same group of participants. METHODS: We investigated the extent to which intrinsic functional coupling among these neurocognitive networks is related to cognitive performance across three neuropsychological domains: executive functioning, psychomotor speed, and verbal memory. Twenty-four non-demented individuals with mild to moderate PD and 20 control participants were scanned at rest and evaluated on three neuropsychological domains. RESULTS: PD participants were impaired on tests from all three domains compared to control participants. Our imaging results demonstrated that successful cognition across healthy aging and Parkinson’s disease participants was related to anti-correlated coupling between the salience and default mode networks. Individuals with poorer performance scores across groups demonstrated more positive salience network/default-mode network coupling. CONCLUSIONS: Successful cognition relies on healthy coupling between the salience and default mode networks, which may become dysfunctional in PD. These results can help inform non-pharmacological interventions (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation) targeting these specific networks before they become vulnerable in early stages of Parkinson’s disease.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 205 - 215en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectClinical neurologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychiatryen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive impairmenten_US
dc.subjectFunctional magnetic resonance imagingen_US
dc.subjectIntrinsic connectivity networksen_US
dc.subjectNeurodegenerationen_US
dc.subjectDefault mode networken_US
dc.subjectSalience networken_US
dc.subjectTest-retest reliabilityen_US
dc.subjectScale brain networksen_US
dc.subjectFunctional connectivityen_US
dc.subjectDopamine dysfunctionen_US
dc.subjectCingulate cortexen_US
dc.subjectWorking-memoryen_US
dc.subjectBasal gangliaen_US
dc.subjectResting brainen_US
dc.subjectImpairmenten_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectBrain mappingen_US
dc.subjectCase-control studiesen_US
dc.subjectCognition disordersen_US
dc.subjectExecutive functionen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectMiddle ageden_US
dc.subjectNeural pathwaysen_US
dc.subjectNeuropsychological testsen_US
dc.subjectParkinson diseaseen_US
dc.subjectPsychomotor disordersen_US
dc.subjectVerbal learningen_US
dc.subjectMedical and health sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychology and cognitive sciencesen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.titleSalience and default mode network coupling predicts cognition in aging and Parkinson’s diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/s1355617715000892
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-5699-6204 (Cronin-Golomb, A)
dc.identifier.mycv51350
dc.identifier.mycv51350


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