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dc.contributor.authorJaywant, Abhisheken_US
dc.contributor.authorMusto, Giovannien_US
dc.contributor.authorNeargarder, Sandyen_US
dc.contributor.authorStavitsky Gilbert, Karinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCronin-Golomb, Aliceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-02T15:26:38Z
dc.date.available2019-04-02T15:26:38Z
dc.date.issued2014-01
dc.identifier.citationA Jaywant, G Musto, S Neargarder, K Stavitsky Gilbert, A Cronin-Golomb. 2014. "The effect of Parkinson’s disease subgroups on verbal and nonverbal fluency." Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp. 278 - 289. https://doi.org/10.1080/13803395.2014.889089
dc.identifier.issn1380-3395
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34395
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Parkinson’s disease (PD) leads to deficits in executive function, including verbal and nonverbal fluency, as a result of compromised frontostriatal circuits. It is unknown whether deficits in verbal and nonverbal fluency in PD are driven by certain subgroups of patients, or how strategy use may facilitate performance. PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-five nondemented individuals with PD, including 36 with right-body onset (RPD; 20 with tremor as their initial symptom, 16 nontremor) and 29 with left-body onset (LPD; 14 with tremor as their initial symptom, 15 nontremor), and 52 normal control participants (NC) took part in the study. MEASUREMENTS: Verbal fluency was assessed using the FAS and Animals tests. Nonverbal fluency was assessed using the Ruff Figural Fluency Test. RESULTS: Both RPD and LPD were impaired in generating words and in using clustering and switching strategies on phonemic verbal fluency, whereas different patterns of impairment were found on nonverbal fluency depending on the interaction of side of onset and initial motor symptom (tremor vs. nontremor). Strategy use correlated with number of correct responses on verbal fluency in LPD, RPD, and NC. By contrast, on nonverbal fluency, strategy use correlated with correct responses for RPD and LPD, but not for NC. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate the importance of considering subgroups in PD and analyzing subcomponents of verbal and nonverbal fluency (correct responses, errors, and strategies), which may depend differently on the integrity of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 278 - 289en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, clinicalen_US
dc.subjectClinical neurologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectParkinson's diseaseen_US
dc.subjectVerbal fluencyen_US
dc.subjectExecutive functionen_US
dc.subjectPrefrontal cortexen_US
dc.subjectNonverbal fluencyen_US
dc.subjectFrontal-lobe lesionsen_US
dc.subjectFigural fluencyen_US
dc.subjectInfluence cognitionen_US
dc.subjectPerformanceen_US
dc.subjectSubtypesen_US
dc.subjectSymptomen_US
dc.subjectTasksen_US
dc.subjectSideen_US
dc.subjectImpairmenten_US
dc.subjectStrategyen_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectDiscrimination (psychology)en_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectLanguage testsen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMiddle ageden_US
dc.subjectNeuropsychological testsen_US
dc.subjectSpeech disordersen_US
dc.subjectStatistics as topicen_US
dc.subjectStatistics, nonparametricen_US
dc.subjectVerbal behavioren_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive scienceen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.titleThe effect of Parkinson’s disease subgroups on verbal and nonverbal fluencyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13803395.2014.889089
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-5699-6204 (Cronin-Golomb, A)
dc.identifier.mycv36420


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