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dc.contributor.authorLinczer, Marionen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-08T17:35:13Z
dc.date.issued1965
dc.date.submitted1965
dc.identifier.otherb14569255
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34593
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe general problem of alteration in viral susceptibility by the irradiation of monolayers of tissue cells in culture was examined in this study; specifically an increased susceptibility of HeLa (an established cell line which was derived from an epidermaid carcinoma of the cervix) to destruction by herpes simplex virus (the virus commonly associated with cold sores or fever blisters). The experimental procedures included the study of the radiosensitivity of the cell line, survival curve analyses expressed as the efficiency of plating, that is the per cent of viable cells capable of forming colonies visible to the unaided eye within twelve days, and finally infectivity studies. Tissue culture has proved to be a very useful tool in the study of radiation effects on tissues of higher animals since the effects of radiation can apparently be explained on the cellular level. Many types of cells have been studied but in all cases the most striking characteristic in irradiated populations is the increased cell size. Ionizing radiation effects both the reproductive and synthesizing capacity of cells with the former being the more sensitive. Some irradiated cells never divide while others divide several times before reproduction stops. After the cells stop dividing, they continue to grow in size forming giants because synthesis of the cellular constituents continues. Giant cells resulting from x-irradiation are more readily destroyed by the action of viruses than are non-irradiated cells. PUCK & MARCUS reported that NDV when plated on a mixture of giant and normal cells, destroyed more of the giants than normal cells. An enhancement of cell susceptibility following irradiation was also demonstrated for two enteroviruses by HSIUNG. The increased susceptibility of x-ray-induced giant cells to CPE of virus and the earlier release of virus by such cells was also demonstrated by LEVINE in studies with the Leon strain of type 3 polio. Many tissue culture-virus systems have been used to demonstrate alterations in susceptibility induced by x-irradiation, but few investigators have used a HeLa-HSV system to study this altered susceptibility using low levels of irradiation (50 roentgens to 500 roentgens) [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectX-irradiationen_US
dc.subjectHerpes simplex virusen_US
dc.subjectInfectious diseasesen_US
dc.titleThe effect of X-irradiation on the susceptibility of hela cells to infection by herpes simplex virusen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBiologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719025579428
dc.identifier.mmsid99181611630001161


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