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dc.contributor.authorQuamina, Benjamin Andréen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-08T17:41:13Z
dc.date.issued1965
dc.date.submitted1965
dc.identifier.otherb14569711
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34670
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractIt is the purpose of this thesis to present the results of exploratory studies on the subcellular localization of human brain ganglioside. Subcellular localization have been limited to rat and guinea pig brain. In addition, data derived from five different methods for the preparation of subcellular particles are compared. Ganglioside is a generic name for a group of complex acidic glycolipids containing fatty acid, sphingosine, hexose, hexosamine, and sialic acid (n-acetyl neuraminic acid, NANA) moieties. This substance was first isolated in 1935 from the brains of children afflicted with Niemann-Pick and Tay-Sachs diseases. This glycolipid was found to differ from the chemically related cerebrosides in its solubility properties and in its red-violet color reaction in the Bial's orcinol test. The moiety of ganglioside responsible for the positive Bial's orcinol test was isolated by hydrolysis and given the name neuraminic acid. Subsequent investigators have used the concentration of n-acetyl neuraminic acid as a measure of ganglioside purity [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectGanglioside biochemistryen_US
dc.subjectGangliosidesen_US
dc.titleStudies on the subcellular distribution of human brain gangliosideen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineBiochemistryen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719025585615
dc.identifier.mmsid99181575580001161


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