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dc.contributor.authorSingh, R. K. Janmeyaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-08T17:47:25Z
dc.date.issued1965
dc.date.submitted1965
dc.identifier.otherb14625507
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34707
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn experiment was designed to study the effects of color on associational and perceptual functions by making explicit the assumptions underlying the Rorschach color shock hypothesis. These are: Shock reaction on the Rorschach test is essentially and anxiety interferes with mental functioning. Any or all aspects of the Rorschach stimulus can be related to such an anxiety reaction. If color is manifested in a protocol, color is assumed to have played a determining role in eliciting such a response. Response to color is an affective response. The arousal of affects influence the associational and perceptual processes. Subjects who use repression to cope with the aroused affects, manifest color shock phenomenon. If gray-black shock is manifested, it is assumed gray has played a determining role in eliciting such a response. The selection of a particular aspect of the Rorschach stimulus is determined by the personality variables [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectRorschach testen_US
dc.subjectColor shocken_US
dc.subjectClinical psychologyen_US
dc.titleEffects of color on associational and perceptual functions in reference to Rorschach color shocken_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719025585979
dc.identifier.mmsid99190928420001161


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