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dc.contributor.authorStarr, David Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-08T17:49:00Z
dc.date.issued1966
dc.date.submitted1966
dc.identifier.otherb14571961
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34725
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractOur purpose in "Heidegger and the 'Crisis of Being' in Western Thought" is to demonstrate that Heidegger's idea of Being as the source of unity and centeredness in human intentionality is the "key" to understanding his thought in three ways. First, it is the basis of his critical analysis of the development of occidental philosophy. Second, it is the explicit theme of his systematic work in Being and Time. Finally, it is the presupposition of his later religio-esthetic writings. As such, the problematic of Being provides a bond of continuity within Heidegger's work and between his work and the tradition out of which it springs. The first phase of our development of this thesis takes the form of a tracing of Heidegger's account of the "devolution" of Western thought. It is Heidegger's belief that the ancient Greeks had a pretheoretical understanding of Being as the mysterious source and center of meaning, that fundamental (i.e., ontological) Truth is the manifestation of Being in finite human striving, and that man is therefore the unique locus of the revelation of Being, standing between pure intentionality and mere thinghood, striving to discover essential meaning in finite life. In this struggle, Heidegger finds the basic condition for the ontological concerns of Heraclitus and Parmenides and also for the tragic vision of the Greek poets. Heidegger regards this pretheoretical intuition of man's ontological status as essentially true and as the source of the philosophical tradition that begins with Plato and Aristotle. Yet, he regards that tradition as a "devolution" in the sense that it is ontologically eccentric, in the sense that its struggle to uncover the meaning of certain structures of human existence at the same time progressively obscures the ontological foundation of its own activity. Heidegger claims that the philosophical tradition extending from Plato to Neitzsche represents an ever more radical descent into ontological error. His argument is in brief compass as follows: Plato in his search to grasp the permanent, essential structures of human existence, hypostatizes them as ideas, or intellectual representations, and begins to interpret Being as ideality and truth as the "correct" representation of eternal ideas by finite reason. Aristotle applies this representational schema to " nature," interpreting Being as the totality of ob jects of possible representations, man as the animal who is capable of systematic representation, truth as the adequacy and consistency of such representations, and assigning levels of Being to the objects of possible representation according to their intrinsic intelligibility, or degree of approach to the perfection of pure form, of self-reflecting reason. In the Middle Ages, Heidegger says, the form of late Greek philosophy is retained with two important modifications. First, complete indubitability becomes one of the necessary conditions for the assertion of the truth of any proposition, since absolute faith in the assertions of dogmatic theology is regarded as the basis and paradigm of all knowledge. Second, the pure form, the self-thinking thought of Aristotle's metaphysics is decisively interpreted as a supra-temporal entity and identified with an absolute rational Subject, the Unlimited personal Creator of HebrewChristian mythology. In modern thought, Heidegger claims, this complex of quasi-fundamental notions enters into a period of crisis through the critical work of Descartes. Rejecting authority as a source of philosophical certainty, Descartes tries to establish the indubitable ground of all representative thinking as the subject engaged in that thinking, thereby in effect rendering the cogito the judge and certifier of the being of all objects of thought [TRUNCATED].en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.titleHeidegger and the "Crisis of Being" in western thoughten_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719025653074
dc.identifier.mmsid99181578100001161


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