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dc.contributor.advisorYoung, Aaron W.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorSymes, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorValles, Katherineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-22T14:17:01Z
dc.date.available2019-04-22T14:17:01Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34873
dc.description.abstractThe 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) virus quickly became a pandemic and a threat to the health of many across the globe. H1N1 was able to preferentially bind to pneumocytes in the lower lung, resulting in atelectasis, surfactant disruption, and eventual acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Management of ARDS during this time included non-ventilatory and ventilatory techniques such as conservative fluid management, prone positioning, differing PEEP levels, and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO). High cost, unequal global access to ECMO centers, and complication rates present challenges to future ECMO expansion. Despite this, the available information supports the use of ECMO for H1N1-associated ARDS. Future studies and simulations should be conducted to expand the knowledge base on using ECMO as a treatment for pandemic influenza-associated ARDS, with particular attention on bridging gaps in access for the most vulnerable and affected populations.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMedicineen_US
dc.subjectARDSen_US
dc.subjectECMOen_US
dc.subjectFluen_US
dc.subjectH1N1en_US
dc.subjectInfluenzaen_US
dc.subjectPandemic level treatmenten_US
dc.titleInfluenza A (H1N1) virus-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome: the potential role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in pandemic level treatmenten_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2019-02-21T20:06:27Z
etd.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineMedical Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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