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dc.contributor.authorLaudate, T. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNeargarder, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCronin-Golomb, Aliceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-26T18:42:27Z
dc.date.available2019-04-26T18:42:27Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationTM Laudate, S Neargarder, A Cronin-Golomb. 2013. "Line bisection in Parkinson's disease: investigation of contributions of visual field, retinal vision, and scanning patterns to visuospatial function.." Behavioral neuroscience, Volume 127, Issue 2, pp. 151 - 151. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0031618
dc.identifier.issn1939-0084
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/34942
dc.description.abstractParkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by disorders of visuospatial function that can impact everyday functioning. Visuospatial difficulties are more prominent in those whose motor symptoms begin on the left body side (LPD) than the right body side (RPD) and have mainly been attributed to parietal dysfunction. The source of visuospatial dysfunction is unclear, as in addition to subcortical–cortical changes, there are irregularities of visual scanning and potentially of retinal-level vision in PD. To assess these potential contributors, performance on a visuospatial task—line bisection—was examined together with retinal structure (nerve fiber layer thickness, measured by optical coherence tomography [OCT]), retinal function (contrast sensitivity, measured by frequency-doubling technology [FDT]), and visual scanning patterns. Participants included 20 nondemented patients (10 LPD, 10 RPD) and 11 normal control (NC) adults. Relative to the other groups, LPD were expected to show rightward bias on horizontal line bisection, especially within the left visual hemispace, and downward bias on vertical bisection. LPD relative rightward bias was confirmed, though not mainly within the left hemispace and not correlated with retinal structure or function. Retinal thinning was seen in LPD relative to RPD. Qualitative visualization of eye movements suggested greater LPD exploration of the right than left side of the line during horizontal bisection, and some overall compression of scanning range in RPD (both orientations) and LPD (primarily vertical). Results indicated that rightward visuospatial bias in our LPD sample arose not from abnormalities at the retinal level but potentially from attentional biases, reflected in eye movement patterns. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)en_US
dc.format.extentp. 151en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBehavioral neuroscience
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral sciencesen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectVisuospatial functionen_US
dc.subjectRetinaen_US
dc.subjectParkinson's diseaseen_US
dc.subjectOptical coherence tomographyen_US
dc.subjectFrequency doubling technologyen_US
dc.subjectLeft hemiParkinsons-diseaseen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectThicknessen_US
dc.subjectDopamineen_US
dc.subjectNeglecten_US
dc.subjectSpaceen_US
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen_US
dc.subjectAttentionen_US
dc.subjectEye movementsen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectFunctional lateralityen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMiddle ageden_US
dc.subjectNeuropsychological testsen_US
dc.subjectOrientationen_US
dc.subjectPerceptual disordersen_US
dc.subjectPsychomotor performanceen_US
dc.subjectTomography, optical coherenceen_US
dc.subjectVisual fieldsen_US
dc.subjectVisual perceptionen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral science & comparative psychologyen_US
dc.titleLine bisection in Parkinson's disease: investigation of contributions of visual field, retinal vision, and scanning patterns to visuospatial functionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0031618
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-5699-6204 (Cronin-Golomb, A)
dc.identifier.mycv30652


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