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dc.contributor.authorIzen, Sarah C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChrastil, Elizabeth R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStern, Chantal E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-06T18:56:14Z
dc.date.available2019-05-06T18:56:14Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-16
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000447445400002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationSarah C Izen, Elizabeth R Chrastil, Chantal E Stern. 2018. "Resting State Connectivity Between Medial Temporal Lobe Regions and Intrinsic Cortical Networks Predicts Performance in a Path Integration Task." FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, Volume 12, pp. ? - ? (12). https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2018.00415
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/35335
dc.description.abstractHumans differ in their individual navigational performance, in part because successful navigation relies on several diverse abilities. One such navigational capability is path integration, the updating of position and orientation during movement, typically in a sparse, landmark-free environment. This study examined the relationship between path integration abilities and functional connectivity to several canonical intrinsic brain networks. Intrinsic networks within the brain reflect past inputs and communication as well as structural architecture. Individual differences in intrinsic connectivity have been observed for common networks, suggesting that these networks can inform our understanding of individual spatial abilities. Here, we examined individual differences in intrinsic connectivity using resting state magnetic resonance imaging (rsMRI). We tested path integration ability using a loop closure task, in which participants viewed a single video of movement in a circle trajectory in a sparse environment, and then indicated whether the video ended in the same location in which it started. To examine intrinsic brain networks, participants underwent a resting state scan. We found that better performance in the loop task was associated with increased connectivity during rest between the central executive network (CEN) and posterior hippocampus, parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and entorhinal cortex. We also found that connectivity between PHC and the default mode network (DMN) during rest was associated with better loop closure performance. The results indicate that interactions between medial temporal lobe (MTL) regions and intrinsic networks that involve prefrontal cortex (PFC) are important for path integration and navigation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR MURI N00014-10-1-0936 and MURI N00014-16-1-2832). fMRI scanning was completed at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging (Charlestown, MA, USA), which receives support from the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR P41RR14075). (ONR MURI N00014-10-1-0936 - Office of Naval Research; MURI N00014-16-1-2832 - Office of Naval Research; NCRR P41RR14075 - National Center for Research Resources)en_US
dc.format.extent12 p.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectResting stateen_US
dc.subjectNavigationen_US
dc.subjectPath integrationen_US
dc.subjectDefault mode networken_US
dc.subjectCentral executive networken_US
dc.subjectFronto-parietal regionsen_US
dc.subjectExecutive functionen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectHuman spatial navigationen_US
dc.subjectBrains default networken_US
dc.subjectHead-direction cellsen_US
dc.subjectFunctional connectivityen_US
dc.subjectEntorhinal cortexen_US
dc.subjectRetrosplenial cortexen_US
dc.subjectParietal cortexen_US
dc.subjectPrefrontal cortexen_US
dc.subjectCognitive mapen_US
dc.subjectNeural basisen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.titleResting state connectivity between medial temporal lobe regions and intrinsic cortical networks predicts performance in a path integration tasken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2018.00415
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv402888


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International