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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Lawrence P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Hastingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-07T19:26:44Z
dc.date.issued1968
dc.date.submitted1968
dc.identifier.otherb14611144
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/35460
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Eng.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractInjection pressures available on commercial injection molding machines have increased from 10,000 to 20,000 psi with 40,000 psi in prospect. The pressure during solidification should strongly influence the crystallinity, and hence mechanical properties, of those regular polymers which can crystallize when cooled from the melt. In this study, samples of isotactic polypropylene were solidified under pressures up to 40,000 psi. In addition to tensile properties, the resultant density, microstructure and DTA structure were examined. From all measurements, it was concluded that the degree of crystallinity decreased with increasing solidification pressure. Spherulites formed under higher pressure were smaller in size and less branched than those formed at low pressure. Yield and tensile strengths were reduced as the solidi fication pressure was increased, the reduction being about 10% when solidi fication occurred at 40,000 psi. At first glance, these findings appear to predict strength differences within a particular molded part depending on the molding pressure used. It is concluded, however, that the strength variation would be less in a commercial part. The loss of pressure in the cavity as a result of freezing off at the in-gate should lead to a reduction in cavity pressure early in the solidification process, a lower mean pressure during freezing, and a relatively higher degree of crystallinity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectEngineeringen_US
dc.subjectPolypropyleneen_US
dc.titleEffects of high pressure solidification on the tensile properties of polypropyleneen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameMaster of Engineeringen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineEngineeringen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719025489008
dc.identifier.mmsid99187809350001161


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