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dc.contributor.authorBanas, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-13T14:22:42Z
dc.date.available2019-05-13T14:22:42Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/35594
dc.description.abstractThe United States has a substantial amount of resources, yet many outcomes are not on par with those of other high-income countries. This reflects in its social policies. National paid family leave is present in most countries, but the United States only provides unpaid leave. This paper examines how the United States developed its family leave policy and compares this to the policymaking processes in Sweden and Great Britain, which are two countries similar to the United States in resources and income, but unlike the United States, they provide national, paid family leave to its citizens. Political institutions such as party systems, interest groups, and public opinion are found to impact the policymaking process and further reflect the values in each country. Understanding how institutions impact policy development and outcomes is vital in learning why the United States lacks many of the comprehensive policies its peers have.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectPolitical scienceen_US
dc.titleWhy the United States lacks comprehensive National family leave policies: a comparative analysisen_US
etd.degree.nameBachelor of Artsen_US
etd.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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