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dc.contributor.authorAtack, Jeremyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMargo, Robert A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-24T10:24:51Z
dc.date.available2019-05-24T10:24:51Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-23
dc.identifier.citationJeremy Atack, Robert A Margo. 2019. "Gallman Revisited: Blacksmithing and American Manufacturing, 1850-1870." Cliometrica (2019) 13: 1. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11698-017-0165-x
dc.identifier.issn1863-2505
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/35675
dc.description.abstractIn nineteenth-century America, blacksmiths were a fixture in every village, town, and city, producing a diverse range of products from axes to wheels and services from repairs to horse shoeing. In constructing his historical GNP accounts, Gallman opted to exclude these “jacks-of-all-trades” from the manufacturing sector, classifying them instead as part of the service sector. However, using establishment-level data for blacksmiths from the federal censuses of manufactures for 1850, 1860, and 1870, we re-examine that choice and show that blacksmiths were an important, if declining, source of manufactured goods. Moreover, as quintessential artisan shops, a close analysis of their structure and operation helps resolve several key puzzles regarding industrialization in the nineteenth century. As “jacks-of-all-trades,” they were generally masters of none (except for their service activities). Moreover, the historical record reveals that several of those who managed to achieve mastery moved on to become specialized manufacturers of that specific product. Such specialized producers had higher productivity levels than those calling themselves blacksmiths producing the same goods, explaining changes in industry mix and the decline of the blacksmith in manufacturing.en_US
dc.format.extent1-23 pagesen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Berlin Heidelbergen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCliometrica
dc.subjectBlacksmithen_US
dc.subjectIndustrializationen_US
dc.subjectEconomies of scaleen_US
dc.subjectSpecializationen_US
dc.subjectLabor productivityen_US
dc.subjectGallmanen_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.subjectHistory of social sciencesen_US
dc.titleGallman revisited: Blacksmithing and American manufacturing, 1850-1870en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11698-017-0165-x
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesSource info: NBER Working Paper No. w23399en_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Economicsen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv236414


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