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dc.contributor.authorBeason-Held, Lori L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-19T11:45:14Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.date.submitted1994
dc.identifier.otherb20359561
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/37119
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile memory function in primates depends on the integrity of the medial temporal lobe, the contribution of the hippocampal formation (HF) independent of the overlying ventromedial temporal cortices, particularly the entorhinal (ENT) and parahippocampal (PHG) cortices, remains unclear. To address this issue we have prepared groups of rhesus monkeys with ibotenic acid lesions of the HF or aspiration lesions of the ENT or PHG cortices. We then administered behavioral tasks to assess the effects of these lesions relative to normal controls. To test recognition memory, the Delayed Non-Matching to Sample (DNMS) task and the Delayed Recognition Span Task (DRST) were administered. On DNMS, all groups were impaired on both acquisition and 2 and 10 minute delays. The DRST, administered in Spatial, Color and Object conditions, yielded slightly different results. On the Spatial condition, all groups were impaired on both unique and repeated trials of the task. On the Color condition, all groups were impaired on unique trials while only the HF group was impaired on repeated trials. On the Object condition, ENT and PHG groups were only impaired on unique trials, while the HF group was unimpaired. To assess associative memory, two choice reversals were administered in Spatial (SR) and Object (OR) modalities. On the SR task, The HF group was impaired on acquisition and the first of three reversal phases. The ENT group was impaired on all three reversals, and the PHG group was impaired on only the last. On the OR task, HF animals were impaired on all reversals, while ENT animals were impaired on the initial reversal and PHG animals on the last two. These results indicate that damage to the HF alone causes impairments in recognition, spatial processing and object reversal learning. They also indicate that ENT and PHG regions make unique contributions to memory processes as seen in additional impairments on DRST and the inability to perform spatial reversals. Thus impairments previously attributed to hippocampal damage in studies where the ENT and PHG cortices were removed in conjunction with the HF need to be reevaluated in view of additional contributions provided by these cortical regions.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectNeurologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurobiologyen_US
dc.subjectHippocampusen_US
dc.subjectRhesus monkeyen_US
dc.subjectRecognition memoryen_US
dc.titleContributions of the hippocampus and related ventromedial temporal cortices to memory in the rhesus monkeyen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineAnatomyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719018165342
dc.identifier.mmsid99189901360001161


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