Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWhittington, Tonien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-04T16:42:08Z
dc.date.available2012-05-04T16:42:08Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-04
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/3734
dc.description.abstractAn exploration and investigation into how a study of flora and fauna, in a local environment, might impact an artist’s studio work was the impetus for this arts-based autoethnographic study. To collect data the artist-researcher played the dual role of an artist and a researcher. She documented her process of art making with photos, sketches, and narratives, reflecting on her practice, in a visual art journal. Data was gathered using descriptive field notes from three locations: from a 400 acre natural preserve which is the artist-researcher’s local environment; the Chicago Botanic Garden; and in the artist-researcher’s studio. Additionally, the researcher conducted interviews with nine working artists to gather information about their art making processes and influences. Through a combination of simple content analysis and constant comparative method, the artist-researcher concluded that artistic practice is influenced by an awareness of environment, and insightful reflection.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsAttribution No Derivatives 3.0 Unporteden_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/
dc.subjectArts-baseden_US
dc.subjectAutoethnographyen_US
dc.subjectFlora and faunaen_US
dc.subjectVisual journalen_US
dc.titleArt Studio Investigation of Flora and Fauna in an Artists Environmenten_US
dc.typeOtheren_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution No Derivatives 3.0 Unported
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution No Derivatives 3.0 Unported