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dc.contributor.authorKura, Sreekanthen_US
dc.contributor.authorXie, Hongyuen_US
dc.contributor.authorFu, Buyinen_US
dc.contributor.authorAyata, Cenken_US
dc.contributor.authorBoas, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSakadzic, Savaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-05T15:44:13Z
dc.date.available2019-09-05T15:44:13Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000428686100002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationSreekanth Kura, Hongyu Xie, Buyin Fu, Cenk Ayata, David A Boas, Sava Sakadzic. 2018. "Intrinsic optical signal imaging of the blood volume changes is sufficient for mapping the resting state functional connectivity in the rodent cortex." JOURNAL OF NEURAL ENGINEERING, Volume 15, Issue 3. https://doi.org/10.1088/1741-2552/aaafe4
dc.identifier.issn1741-2560
dc.identifier.issn1741-2552
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/37730
dc.descriptionPublished in final edited form as: J Neural Eng. 2018 June 01; 15(3): 035003–. doi:10.1088/1741-2552/aaafe4.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective. Resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) allows the study of functional organization in normal and diseased brain by measuring the spontaneous brain activity generated under resting conditions. Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOSI) based on multiple illumination wavelengths has been used successfully to compute RSFC maps in animal studies. The IOSI setup complexity would be greatly reduced if only a single wavelength can be used to obtain comparable RSFC maps. Approach. We used anesthetized mice and performed various comparisons between the RSFC maps based on single wavelength as well as oxy-, deoxy- and total hemoglobin concentration changes. Main results. The RSFC maps based on IOSI at a single wavelength selected for sensitivity to the blood volume changes are quantitatively comparable to the RSFC maps based on oxy- and total hemoglobin concentration changes obtained by the more complex IOSI setups. Moreover, RSFC maps do not require CCD cameras with very high frame acquisition rates, since our results demonstrate that they can be computed from the data obtained at frame rates as low as 5 Hz. Significance. Our results will have general utility for guiding future RSFC studies based on IOSI and making decisions about the IOSI system designs.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful to Adam Bauer for his guidance on replicating their experimental setup, and Silvina Ferradal and Erin Buckley for useful discussions. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NIH grants NS091230, NS055104, NS057198, EB021018, EB00790, and EB018464, the Fondation Leducq, the State Scholarship Fund of the China Scholarship Council (Construction of high-level university projects, No. 201406100123), and the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, nos. 81472150). (NS091230 - NIH; NS055104 - NIH; NS057198 - NIH; EB021018 - NIH; EB00790 - NIH; EB018464 - NIH; Fondation Leducq; 201406100123 - China Scholarship Council; 81472150 - Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC))en_US
dc.description.urihttps://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-2552/aaafe4/meta
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJOURNAL OF NEURAL ENGINEERING
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectEngineering, biomedicalen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectEngineeringen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectResting state functional connectivityen_US
dc.subjectCerebral cortexen_US
dc.subjectIntrinsic optical signal imagingen_US
dc.subjectMOUSE-BRAINen_US
dc.subjectFMRIen_US
dc.subjectMRIen_US
dc.subjectBiomedical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectClinical sciencesen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectBiomedical engineeringen_US
dc.titleIntrinsic optical signal imaging of the blood volume changes is sufficient for mapping the resting state functional connectivity in the rodent cortexen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1741-2552/aaafe4
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-6709-7711 (Boas, David A)
dc.description.oaversionAccepted manuscript
dc.identifier.mycv342112


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