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dc.contributor.authorJahani, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFantana, A.L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarper, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEllison, J.M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBoas, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorForester, B.P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYücel, Meryem A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T15:58:37Z
dc.date.available2019-09-10T15:58:37Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationS. Jahani, A.L. Fantana, D. Harper, J.M. Ellison, D.A. Boas, B.P. Forester, M.A. Yücel. 2017. "fNIRS can robustly measure brain activity during memory encoding and retrieval in healthy subjects." Scientific reports, Volume 7, Issue 1:9533. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-09868-w
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/37765
dc.description.abstractEarly intervention in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) requires novel biomarkers that can capture changes in brain activity at an early stage. Current AD biomarkers are expensive and/or invasive and therefore unsuitable for use as screening tools, but a non-invasive, inexpensive, easily accessible screening method could be useful in both clinical and research settings. Prior studies suggest that especially paired-associate learning tasks may be useful in detecting the earliest memory impairment in AD. Here, we investigated the utility of functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy in measuring brain activity from prefrontal, parietal and temporal cortices of healthy adults (n = 19) during memory encoding and retrieval under a face-name paired-associate learning task. Our findings demonstrate that encoding of novel face-name pairs compared to baseline as well as compared to repeated face-name pairs resulted in significant activation in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while recalling resulted in activation in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex bilaterally. Moreover, brain response to recalling was significantly higher than encoding in medial, superior and middle frontal cortices for novel faces. Overall, this study shows that fNIRS can reliably measure cortical brain activation during a face-name paired-associate learning task. Future work will include similar measurements in populations with progressing memory deficits.en_US
dc.format.extent9533en_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific reports
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectBrainen_US
dc.subjectBrain mappingen_US
dc.subjectCerebral cortexen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHealthy volunteersen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectImage processing, computer-assisteden_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectMental recallen_US
dc.subjectSpectrum analysisen_US
dc.subjectYoung adulten_US
dc.titlefNIRS can robustly measure brain activity during memory encoding and retrieval in healthy subjectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-09868-w
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-6709-7711 (Boas, DA)
dc.identifier.mycv281451


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© The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or
format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this
article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the
material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the
copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2017. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.