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dc.contributor.authorThornhill, Daniel J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRotjan, Randi D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Brian D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChilcoat, Geoff C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorIglesias-Prieto, Robertoen_US
dc.contributor.authorKemp, Dustin W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLaJeunesse, Todd C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Jennifer McCabeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Gregory W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShannon, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorWarner, Mark E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFitt, William K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T17:12:55Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T17:12:55Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-22
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000299684700065&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationDaniel J Thornhill, Randi D Rotjan, Brian D Todd, Geoff C Chilcoat, Roberto Iglesias-Prieto, Dustin W Kemp, Todd C LaJeunesse, Jennifer McCabe Reynolds, Gregory W Schmidt, Thomas Shannon, Mark E Warner, William K Fitt. 2011. "A Connection between Colony Biomass and Death in Caribbean Reef-Building Corals." PLOS ONE, Volume 6, Issue 12, pp. ? - ? (13). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029535
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/37788
dc.description.abstractIncreased sea-surface temperatures linked to warming climate threaten coral reef ecosystems globally. To better understand how corals and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.) respond to environmental change, tissue biomass and Symbiodinium density of seven coral species were measured on various reefs approximately every four months for up to thirteen years in the Upper Florida Keys, United States (1994–2007), eleven years in the Exuma Cays, Bahamas (1995–2006), and four years in Puerto Morelos, Mexico (2003–2007). For six out of seven coral species, tissue biomass correlated with Symbiodinium density. Within a particular coral species, tissue biomasses and Symbiodinium densities varied regionally according to the following trends: Mexico≥Florida Keys≥Bahamas. Average tissue biomasses and symbiont cell densities were generally higher in shallow habitats (1–4 m) compared to deeper-dwelling conspecifics (12–15 m). Most colonies that were sampled displayed seasonal fluctuations in biomass and endosymbiont density related to annual temperature variations. During the bleaching episodes of 1998 and 2005, five out of seven species that were exposed to unusually high temperatures exhibited significant decreases in symbiotic algae that, in certain cases, preceded further decreases in tissue biomass. Following bleaching, Montastraea spp. colonies with low relative biomass levels died, whereas colonies with higher biomass levels survived. Bleaching- or disease-associated mortality was also observed in Acropora cervicornis colonies; compared to A. palmata, all A. cervicornis colonies experienced low biomass values. Such patterns suggest that Montastraea spp. and possibly other coral species with relatively low biomass experience increased susceptibility to death following bleaching or other stressors than do conspecifics with higher tissue biomass levels.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe National Science Foundation (grants 9906976 and 0137007), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Office of Naval Research and the Bleaching Group of the Coral Reef Targeted Research and Capacity Building for Management funded this research. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. (9906976 - National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; 0137007 - National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Office of Naval Research; Bleaching Group of the Coral Reef Targeted Research and Capacity Building for Management)en_US
dc.format.extent13 p.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLOS ONE
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary sciencesen_US
dc.subjectTissue biomassen_US
dc.subjectMontastrea-annularisen_US
dc.subjectBleaching eventen_US
dc.subjectSymbiotic coralen_US
dc.subjectPhotosystem-IIen_US
dc.subjectLong-termen_US
dc.subjectZooxanthellaeen_US
dc.subjectSymbiodiniumen_US
dc.subjectDiversityen_US
dc.subjectGrowthen_US
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectAnthozoaen_US
dc.subjectBiomassen_US
dc.subjectCaribbean Regionen_US
dc.subjectSeasonsen_US
dc.subjectMD multidisciplinaryen_US
dc.titleA connection between colony biomass and death in Caribbean Reef-Building Coralsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0029535
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Biologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3401-9784 (Rotjan, Randi D)
dc.identifier.mycv182825


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