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dc.contributor.authorGarrett, Eva C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzales, Lauren A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKirk, E. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSeiffert, Erik R.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialNew Orleans, LAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T18:36:06Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T18:36:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000423063102345&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationEva C Garrett, Lauren A Gonzales, E.C. Kirk, Erik R Seiffert. 2017. "Evolution of the primate vomeronasal system: fossil evidence from the Fayum." AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 86th Annual Meeting of the American-Association-of-Physical-Anthropologists (AAPA). New Orleans, LA, 2017-04-19 - 2017-04-22. Volume162, Issue1, Pages 191-196.
dc.identifier.issn0002-9483
dc.identifier.issn1096-8644
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/37831
dc.description.abstractExtant primates vary dramatically in the presence and development of the vomeronasal system (VNS), which largely detects social pheromones and anti-predator chemosignals. While the strepsirrhine VNS resembles most mammals, haplorhines either have derived VNS traits with ambiguous effects on vomeronasal function, or have lost the system entirely. While a reduced reliance on vomeronasal olfaction in haplorhines is inferred, few studies have addressed VNS variation in extinct primates to examine the timing and context of the loss of this system. We have previously identified an osteological correlate of the vomeronasal organ, the vomeronasal groove (VNG), which allows us to implement a paleontological approach toward understanding primate VNS evolution. We investigated cranial material of fossil primates for the presence or absence of a VNG using microCT scans. The VNG was present in a broad temporal and taxonomic range of primate fossils, including plesiadapiforms, adapiforms, omomyoids, crown platyrrhines, stem anthropoids, and stem catarrhines. Notably the VNG persists as a relatively small gutter in the stem catarrhine Aegyptopithecus zeuxis, but is absent in advanced stem catarrhine Saadanius hijazensis, and the Miocene cercopithecoid Victoriapithecus. We estimate that VNG loss occurred between 30-28ma, based on our sample. These dates complement estimates for the accelerated rate of deleterious mutations, and loss of function, in the TRPC2 pheromone transduction gene in catarrhines between 40-25ma. Further exploration of the VNG in fossil primates will lead to a more thorough understanding of past sensory environments and their ultimate effects on sensory specializations of extant lineages.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 191-196en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectEvolutionary biologyen_US
dc.subjectArchaeologyen_US
dc.titleEvolution of the primate vomeronasal system: fossil evidence from the Fayumen_US
dc.typeConference materialsen_US
dc.description.versionFirst author draften_US
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.notesConference abstracten_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Anthropologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv343415


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