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dc.contributor.authorCassidy, Donnaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-26T14:38:15Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.date.submitted1988
dc.identifier.otherb15886165
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38014
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Boston Universityen_US
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe music-painting analogy had a pervasive influence on American early modernist art criticism, theory, and painting. Music became an aesthetic model and a theme in painting, and, for some artists and critics, music, particularly jazz and "noise music," expressed the energy of modern America. This dissertation addresses these aspects of the music-painting analogy, using Arthur G. Dove, John Marin, and Joseph Stella as case studies.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectPainted musicen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjectFine artsen_US
dc.subjectDove, Arthur G.en_US
dc.subjectMarin, Johnen_US
dc.subjectStella, Josephen_US
dc.subjectArt historyen_US
dc.subjectArt criticismen_US
dc.subjectEarly modernist arten_US
dc.titleThe painted music of America in the works of Arthur G. Dove, John Marin, and Joseph Stella: an aspect of cultural nationalismen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.description.embargo2031-01-01
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineArt Historyen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.barcode11719011873793
dc.identifier.mmsid99182118010001161


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