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dc.contributor.advisorCassandras, Christos G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yueen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-07T18:51:20Z
dc.date.available2019-10-07T18:51:20Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38203
dc.description.abstractIntelligent transportation systems involve a variety of information and control systems methodologies, from cooperative systems which aim at traffic flow optimization by means of vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication, to information fusion from multiple traffic sensing modalities. This thesis aims to address three problems in intelligent transportation systems, one in optimal control of connected automated vehicles, one in discrete-event and hybrid traffic simulation model, and one in sensing and classifying roadway obstacles in smart cities. The first set of problems addressed relates to optimally controlling connected automated vehicles (CAVs) crossing an urban intersection without any explicit traffic signaling. A decentralized optimal control framework is established whereby, under proper coordination among CAVs, each CAV can jointly minimize its energy consumption and travel time subject to hard safety constraints. A closed-form analytical solution is derived while taking speed, control, and safety constraints into consideration. The analytical solution of each such problem, when it exists, yields the optimal CAV acceleration/deceleration. The framework is capable of accommodating for turns and ensures the absence of collisions. In the meantime, a measurement of passenger comfort is taken into account while the vehicles make turns. In addition to the first-in-first-out (FIFO) ordering structure, the concept of dynamic resequencing is introduced which aims at further increasing the traffic throughput. This thesis also studies the impact of CAVs and shows the benefit that can be achieved by incorporating CAVs to conventional traffic. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed solution, a discrete-event and hybrid simulation framework based on SimEvents is proposed, which facilitates safety and performance evaluation of an intelligent transportation system. The traffic simulation model enables traffic study at the microscopic level, including new control algorithms for CAVs under different traffic scenarios, the event-driven aspects of transportation systems, and the effects of communication delays. The framework spans multiple toolboxes including MATLAB, Simulink, and SimEvents. In another direction, an unsupervised anomaly detection system is developed based on data collected through the Street Bump smartphone application. The system, which is built based on signal processing techniques and the concept of information entropy, is capable of generating a prioritized list of roadway obstacles, such that the higher-ranked entries are most likely to be actionable bumps (e.g., potholes) requiring immediate attention, while those lower-ranked are most likely to be nonactionable bumps(e.g., flat castings, cobblestone streets, speed bumps) for which no immediate action is needed. This system enables the City to efficiently prioritize repairs. Results on an actual data set provided by the City of Boston illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the system in practice.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectElectrical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectAutonomous vehiclesen_US
dc.subjectData analyticsen_US
dc.subjectMotion planningen_US
dc.subjectTraffic controlen_US
dc.subjectTrajectory optimizationen_US
dc.titleMethods in intelligent transportation systems exploiting vehicle connectivity, autonomy and roadway dataen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2019-09-29T04:01:19Z
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineSystems Engineeringen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-7366-3778


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