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dc.contributor.authorTiganj, Zoranen_US
dc.contributor.authorCromer, Jason A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Jefferson E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Earl K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Marc W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-08T15:45:13Z
dc.date.available2019-10-08T15:45:13Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000433605100001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationZoran Tiganj, Jason A Cromer, Jefferson E Roy, Earl K Miller, Marc W Howard. 2018. "Compressed Timeline of Recent Experience in Monkey Lateral Prefrontal Cortex." JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE, Volume 30, Issue 7, pp. 935 - 950 (16). https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_01273
dc.identifier.issn0898-929X
dc.identifier.issn1530-8898
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38213
dc.description.abstractCognitive theories suggest that working memory maintains not only the identity of recently presented stimuli but also a sense of the elapsed time since the stimuli were presented. Previous studies of the neural underpinnings of working memory have focused on sustained firing, which can account for maintenance of the stimulus identity, but not for representation of the elapsed time. We analyzed single-unit recordings from the lateral prefrontal cortex of macaque monkeys during performance of a delayed match-to-category task. Each sample stimulus triggered a consistent sequence of neurons, with each neuron in the sequence firing during a circumscribed period. These sequences of neurons encoded both stimulus identity and elapsed time. The encoding of elapsed time became less precise as the sample stimulus receded into the past. These findings suggest that working memory includes a compressed timeline of what happened when, consistent with long-standing cognitive theories of human memory.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors gratefully acknowledge support from ONR MURI N00014-16-1-2832, NIBIB R01EB022864, NIMH R01MH112169, and NIMH R37MH087027. (N00014-16-1-2832 - ONR MURI; R01EB022864 - NIBIB; R01MH112169 - NIMH; R37MH087027 - NIMH)en_US
dc.format.extent935 - 950 (16)en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherMIT PRESSen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJOURNAL OF COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, experimentalen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectAction potentialsen_US
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectComputer simulationen_US
dc.subjectConcept formationen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectLikelihood functionsen_US
dc.subjectMacaca mulattaen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMemory, short-termen_US
dc.subjectModels, neurologicalen_US
dc.subjectNeuronsen_US
dc.subjectPhotic stimulationen_US
dc.subjectPrefrontal cortexen_US
dc.subjectReaction timeen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectCognitive sciencesen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.titleCompressed timeline of recent experience in monkey lateral prefrontal cortexen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/jocn_a_01273
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1478-1237 (Howard, Marc W)
dc.identifier.mycv365529


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