Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFolkerts, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorRutishauser, Uelien_US
dc.contributor.authorHoward, Marc W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-08T15:59:34Z
dc.date.available2019-10-08T15:59:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-25
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000431123900012&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationSarah Folkerts, Ueli Rutishauser, Marc W Howard. 2018. "Human Episodic Memory Retrieval Is Accompanied by a Neural Contiguity Effect." JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, Volume 38, Issue 17, pp. 4200 - 4211 (12). https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2312-17.2018
dc.identifier.issn0270-6474
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38217
dc.description.abstractCognitive psychologists have long hypothesized that experiences are encoded in a temporal context that changes gradually over time. When an episodic memory is retrieved, the state of context is recovered—a jump back in time. We recorded from single units in the medial temporal lobe of epilepsy patients performing an item recognition task. The population vector changed gradually over minutes during presentation of the list. When a probe from the list was remembered with high confidence, the population vector reinstated the temporal context of the original presentation of that probe during study, a neural contiguity effect that provides a possible mechanism for behavioral contiguity effects. This pattern was only observed for well remembered probes; old probes that were not well remembered showed an anti-contiguity effect. These results constitute the first direct evidence that recovery of an episodic memory in humans is associated with retrieval of a gradually changing state of temporal context, a neural “jump back in time” that parallels the act of remembering.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (Grants R01EB022864 and R01MH112169 to M.W.H. and Grants R01MH110831 and U01NS103792 to U.R.), the National Science Foundation (CAREER Award BCS-1554105 to U.R.), and a Memory and Cognitive Disorders Award from the McKnight Foundation for Neuroscience (U.R.). We thank Nigel Stallard, Inder Singh, Zoran Tiganj, Amy Criss, and Rosie Cowell for helpful discussions. (R01EB022864 - National Institutes of Health; R01MH112169 - National Institutes of Health; R01MH110831 - National Institutes of Health; U01NS103792 - National Institutes of Health; BCS-1554105 - National Science Foundation; Memory and Cognitive Disorders Award from the McKnight Foundation for Neuroscience)en_US
dc.format.extent4200 - 4211 (12)en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSOC NEUROSCIENCEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectContiguity effecten_US
dc.subjectEpisodic memoryen_US
dc.subjectRecollectionen_US
dc.subjectNeurology & neurosurgeryen_US
dc.subjectMedical and health sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychology and cognitive sciencesen_US
dc.titleHuman episodic memory retrieval is accompanied by a neural contiguity effecten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2312-17.2018
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1478-1237 (Howard, Marc W)
dc.identifier.mycv362468


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record