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dc.contributor.authorByrne, Theresa Anneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-16T15:46:43Z
dc.date.available2019-12-16T15:46:43Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.date.submitted1995
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)41336901
dc.identifier.otherb24646155
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38848
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (D. Sc.)--Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Graduate Dentistry, 1995 (Nutritional Science).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references: (leaves 193-196).en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground - Patients with gastrointestinal (GI) failure have a prolonged or permanent inability to ingest, digest and/or absorb adequate fluid and nutrients to prevent dehydration, progressive malnutrition and the wasting of body protein. This loss of body protein is associated with immunosuppression, respiratory and skeletal muscle weakness which contribute further to the patients' debility. Although standard methods of enteral and total parenteral nutrition (TIN) are required to sustain life, they remain supportive therapies which are relatively ineffective at repleting body protein or enhancing the function of the diseased or resected intestinal tract, thus, often failing to contribute to the rehabilitation of the patient. Because specific growth factors (e.g. growth hormone - GH) and nutrients (e.g. glutamine - GLN) can produce anabolic effects on body composition, induce trophic effects on the gastrointestinal tract and influence bowel function, 3 studies were conducted to determine if such substances could accelerate protein accrual, enhance nutrient absorption and reduce or eliminate long-term dependence upon specialized findings. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectGastrointestinal diseasesen_US
dc.subjectGastrointestinal hormonesen_US
dc.titleRehabilitation of patients with gastrointestinal failureen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Science in Nutritional Sciences and Biochemistryen_US
etd.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
etd.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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