Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJensen, Lisa J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-16T15:53:18Z
dc.date.available2019-12-16T15:53:18Z
dc.date.issued1986
dc.date.submitted1986
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)41356915
dc.identifier.otherb2238988x
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38916
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Sc.)--Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Graduate Dentistry, 1986 (Dental Public Health).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references: (leaves 39-41).en_US
dc.description.abstractA national survey representing four states was sent to 400 randomly selected dentists who might use implants. The survey included demographic characteristics,current product selections, awareness of implant substantiation, and the feelings and factors which influence implant purchases. Fifty-nine percent of the questionnaires were returned and considered usable. Respondents included 31% general practitioners, 15% oral surgeons, 12% periodontists, 19% prosthodontists, 10% implantologists, and 14% multiple specialty. Seventy-four percent of them had performed implant procedures and the predominant age range was 37-42 years (25%). The current choices for implant preference and utilization were ranked by the specialists. First choice, and most used implant was the alloy cyllinder followed in descending order by the titanium blade, titanium screw, and titanium sprayed cyllinder. The implant with the most recognized research support was the titanium screw (50%), and if price of the implant were not the factor, 33% of the specialists preferred the titanium screw. Seventy-eight percent felt convinced by implants yet no one was opposed to these products. The single most important factor indicated to have effects on a purchasing decision was the product's research support, stated by 85% of the dentists, yet price was not a factor. While marketing specialists continue to try to uncover the true role price factors play in the dental marketplace, the evidence seemed to suggest at least two influencing factors; the research support of an implant and its cost.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectConsumer behavioren_US
dc.subjectDental materialsen_US
dc.subjectDental implantsen_US
dc.titleConsumer research :en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science in Dental Public Healthen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineDental Care Managementen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record