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dc.contributor.authorLabs, Kelly N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-16T15:55:10Z
dc.date.available2019-12-16T15:55:10Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38941
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (MSD) --Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 2013 (Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographic references: leaves 27-32.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Interest in upper airway shape and dimensions has increased steadily over the past decades due to the association between upper airway configuration and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as well as associations with various craniofacial morphologies. With the advent of cone-bean computed tomography (CBCT), airway studies can now offer crucial insight about this complex space. Though many studies have explored changes to the airway m reference to applied treatments and/or existing conditions, there has been little sound scientific data collected to determine normative reference data over pubertal growth. The few normative studies that do exist have had broad-spectrum selection criteria and used chronological age rather than skeletal age as a reference. The literature is also lacking reference data determining volumetric airway differences between genders throughout the phases of puberty. Normative data will provide valuable reference from which all future studies on airway can use as a baseline to more accurately measure changes that occur in this area. Unless it is determined what changes are attributed to normal pubertal growth, changes to the airway due to orthodontic or orthognathic treatment and/or existing conditions cannot be accurately measured. Material and Methods: Pre-treatment Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)films of 140 human subjects were examined and selected for ethnicity (Caucasian), normal BMI and skeletal class 1 relationship. Patients who were medically compromised, had incomplete records, history of craniofacial trauma, asthma, sleep apnea, posterior cross-bite, maxillary constriction, mouth-breathing, lip competency, previous orthodontic treatment or low tongue posture in CBCT film were excluded from the study. The remaining 77 subjects were placed into three groups using a skeletal maturity assessment of hand-wrist radiographs. Using skeletal maturity indicators (SMI) to assess growth status, subjects were placed into (A: SMI1-3) pre-pubertal, (B: SMI4-7) pubertal or (C: SMI8-11 or 25-40yrs) post-pubertal groups. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectPharynxen_US
dc.subjectPharynxen_US
dc.titleThree-dimensional analysis of pharyngeal airway developmenten_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science in Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineOrthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedicsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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