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dc.contributor.authorLo, Chieh-Shanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-16T15:56:58Z
dc.date.available2019-12-16T15:56:58Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.date.submitted1993
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)28636493
dc.identifier.otherb19934178
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/38952
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle appears as written.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Sc.D.)--Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Graduate Dentistry, 1993 (Pediatric Dentistry)en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 68-76)en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough amalgam does not adhere to tooth structure it is the most commonly used restorative material in dentistry. Undercutting is the most common method whereby retention is achieved for amalgam restorations but, because of amalgam's lack of adhesion, it is often necessary to make supplemental grooves and/or place retentive pins. It is to be noted that added in the laudable effort to reduce microleakage and strengthen the relationship between amalgam and dentin, resin bonded amalgam has been introduced. This innovation provides a technique whereby unfilled composite resin is bonded to the dentin, and amalgam is bonded to the resin producing thereby a composite/resin amalgam which has adhesive properties and reduced microleakage (Chang, 1992; Tjan, 1992; Scherman, 1990; Edgren, 1992). In a clinical setting, excessive tooth structure is often removed to improve retention in the preparation of extensively decayed teeth. This obviously weakens the supporting tooth structure at the expense of healthy tooth structure. On the other hand, retention of the restoration may be compromised in the effort to preserve tooth structure. If indeed resin bonding increases the retention of amalgam restorations, pins may no longer be needed, or they may be used in conjunction with resin bonding techniques in order to gain more strength than either technique alone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare the retention of resin bonded amalgam with and without pins.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectDental amalgamen_US
dc.subjectDental bondingen_US
dc.subjectDental pinsen_US
dc.subjectResinsen_US
dc.titleComparison of the shear strength of pin retained and resin bonded amalgam coresen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science in Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplinePediatric Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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