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dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Vivien A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-23T19:47:26Z
dc.date.available2019-12-23T19:47:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-11
dc.identifier.citationVivien A Schmidt. 2018. "Rethinking EU Governance: From ‘Old’ to ‘New’ Approaches to Who Steers Integration*." JCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies, Volume 56, Issue 7, pp. 1544 - 1561. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcms.12783
dc.identifier.issn0021-9886
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39036
dc.description*I wish to thank the guest editors of this Special Issue, Mark Pollack and Mareike Kleine, for their impressive stewardship of the entire project along with their extremely perceptive and careful editorial suggestions for my own article. I would also like to thank the anonymous referees for their very helpful comments and their close reading of the manuscript. The manuscript has its origins in a working paper for the Istituto Affari Internazionali, and benefited from comments by Lorenzo Vai and Pier Domenico Tortola. Its elaboration was undertaken under the auspices of the EU Commission Horizon 2020 project: ‘European Legitimacy in Governing through Hard Times’ (# 649456—ENLIGHTEN), and further benefited from comments by Ramona Coman, Amandine Crespy and Frederik Ponjaert. Thanks to them for their insightful suggestions as well as to participants in the workshops at Princeton and the EUI, including the two commentators on my article, Gerda Falkner and Lewis G. Miller, and especially, needless to say, Andrew Moravcsik himself.en_US
dc.description.abstractEU scholars have long been divided on the main drivers of European integration. The original approaches were at odds on whether EU level intergovernmental actors or supranational actors were better able to exercise coercive or institutional power to pursue their interests, with Andrew Moravcsik's liberal intergovernmentalism serving as a baseline for one side of those debates. Newer approaches are similarly divided, but see power in terms of ideational innovation and consensus‐focused deliberation. The one thing old and new approaches have in common is that they ignore the parliamentarists, new and old. What all sides to the debates have failed to recognize is the reality of a ‘new’ EU governance of more politically charged dynamics among all three main EU actors exercising different kinds of power. This has roots not only in the national level's increasing ‘politics against policy’ and its bottom up effects on the EU level. It also stems from EU institutional interactions at the top, and its ‘policy with politics’.en_US
dc.format.extent1544 - 1561en_US
dc.languageen
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies
dc.subjectGovernanceen_US
dc.subjectEuropean Unionen_US
dc.subjectIntergovernentalismen_US
dc.subjectSupranationalismen_US
dc.subjectParliamentarismen_US
dc.subjectPoliticizationen_US
dc.subjectPolitical science & public administrationen_US
dc.subjectPolicy and administrationen_US
dc.subjectPolitical scienceen_US
dc.subjectLawen_US
dc.titleRethinking EU governance: from ‘old’ to ‘new’ approaches to who steers integration*en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jcms.12783
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesPublished in the symposium issue: “Liberal Intergovernmentalism and Its Critics” eds. Mareike Kleine and Mark Pollack.en_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studiesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.date.online2018-08-30
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-7764-0610 (Schmidt, Vivien A)
dc.identifier.mycv426823


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