Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBuston, P. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEmlen, S. T.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-08T15:14:43Z
dc.date.available2020-01-08T15:14:43Z
dc.date.issued2003-07-22
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000184371000040&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationP.M. Buston, S.T. Emlen. 2003. "Cognitive processes underlying human mate choice: The relationship between self-perception and mate preference in Western society." PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Volume 100, Issue 15, pp. 8805 - 8810 (6). https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1533220100
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39055
dc.description.abstractThis study tested two hypotheses concerning the cognitive processes underlying human mate choice in Western society: (i) mate preference is conditional in that the selectivity of individuals' mate preference is based on their perception of themselves as long-term partners, and (ii) the decision rule governing such conditional mate preference is based on translating perception of oneself on a given attribute into a comparable selectivity of preference for the same attribute in a mate. Both hypotheses were supported. A two-part questionnaire was completed by 978 heterosexual residents of Ithaca, New York, aged 18-24; they first rated the importance they placed on 10 attributes in a long-term partner and then rated their perception of themselves on those same attributes. Both women and men who rated themselves highly were significantly more selective in their mate preference. When the 10 attributes were grouped into four evolutionarily relevant categories (indicative of wealth and status, family commitment, physical appearance, and sexual fidelity), the greatest amount of variation in the selectivity of mate preference in each category was explained by self-perception in the same category of attributes. We conclude that, in Western society, humans use neither an "opposites-attract" nor a "reproductive-potentials-attract" decision rule in their choice of long-term partners but rather a "likes-attract" rule based on a preference for partners who are similar to themselves across a number of characteristics.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 8805 - 8810en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNATL ACAD SCIENCESen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary sciencesen_US
dc.subjectDecision rulesen_US
dc.subjectAssortative matingen_US
dc.subjectMarriageen_US
dc.subjectReproductive successen_US
dc.subjectAlternative hypothesesen_US
dc.subjectPhysical attractivenessen_US
dc.subjectGender differencesen_US
dc.subjectMarital successen_US
dc.subjectMarried couplesen_US
dc.subjectFemale choiceen_US
dc.subjectSelectionen_US
dc.subjectStrategiesen_US
dc.subjectDecisionsen_US
dc.subjectDominanceen_US
dc.subjectAdolescenten_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectCognitionen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMarriageen_US
dc.subjectModels, psychologicalen_US
dc.subjectNew Yorken_US
dc.subjectSelf concepten_US
dc.subjectSocial environmenten_US
dc.subjectSurveys and questionnairesen_US
dc.titleCognitive processes underlying human mate choice: the relationship between self-perception and mate preference in Western societyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1533220100
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Biologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv48816


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record