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dc.contributor.authorArcher, M. O.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHartinger, M. D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRedmon, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAngelopoulos, V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Brian M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-13T15:04:18Z
dc.date.available2020-01-13T15:04:18Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000452865700010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationM.O. Archer, M.D. Hartinger, R. Redmon, V. Angelopoulos, B.M. Walsh. 2018. "First Results From Sonification and Exploratory Citizen Science of Magnetospheric ULF Waves: Long-Lasting Decreasing-Frequency Poloidal Field Line Resonance Following Geomagnetic Storms." SPACE WEATHER-THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS, Volume 16, Issue 11, pp. 1753 - 1769 (17). https://doi.org/10.1029/2018SW001988
dc.identifier.issn1542-7390
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39080
dc.description.abstractMagnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves contribute to space weather in the solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere system. The monitoring of these waves by space- and ground-based instruments, however, produces "big data" which is difficult to navigate, mine and analyse effectively. We present sonification, the process of converting an oscillatory time-series into audible sound, and citizen science, where members of the public contribute to scientific investigations, as a means to potentially help tackle these issues. Magnetometer data in the ULF range at geostationary orbit has been sonified and released to London high schools as part of exploratory projects. While this approach reduces the overall likelihood of useful results from any particular group of citizen scientists compared to typical citizen science projects, it promotes independent learning and problem solving by all participants and can result in a small number of unexpected research outcomes. We present one such example, a case study identified by a group of students -of decreasing-frequency poloidal field line resonances over multiple days found to occur during the recovery phase of a CME-driven geomagnetic storm. Simultaneous plasma density measurements show that the decreasing frequencies were due to the refilling of the plasmasphere following the storm. The waves were likely generated by internal plasma processes. Further exploration of the audio revealed many similar events following other major storms, thus they are much more common than previously thought. We therefore highlight the potential of sonification and exploratory citizen science in addressing some of the challenges facing ULF wave research.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipM. O. Archer thanks the students of Eltham Hill School who contributed to this study: Megan Wilkin, Hanan Mohamed, Isobel Currie, and David Perry and their teacher Russel Dobson. M. D. Hartinger was supported by NASA NNX17AD35G. We thank NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information for access to GOES magnetometer data at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/satellite/goes/. We acknowledge NASA contract NAS5-02099 and the THEMIS Mission, specifically J. W. Bonnell and F. S. Mozer for EFI data; C. W. Carlson and J. P. McFadden for ESA data; and K. H. Glassmeier, U. Auster, and W. Baumjohann for the use of FGM data provided under the lead of the Technical University of Braunschweig and with financial support through the German Ministry for Economy and Technology and the German Center for Aviation and Space (DLR) under contract 50 OC 0302. THEMIS data and analysis software (SPEDAS) are available at http://themis.ssl.berkeley.edu. The OMNI data were obtained from the NASA/GSFC OMNIWeb interface at http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov. We thank the institutes who maintain the IMAGE Magnetometer Array: Tromso Geophysical Observatory of UiT the Arctic University of Norway (Norway), Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland), Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland), GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences (Germany), Geological Survey of Sweden (Sweden), Swedish Institute of Space Physics (Sweden), Sodankyla Geophysical Observatory of the University of Oulu (Finland), and Polar Geophysical Institute (Russia). (NNX17AD35G - NASA; NAS5-02099 - NASA; German Ministry for Economy and Technology; 50 OC 0302 - German Center for Aviation and Space (DLR))en_US
dc.format.extentp. 1753 - 1769en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSPACE WEATHER-THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectPhysical sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAstronomy & astrophysicsen_US
dc.subjectGeochemistry & geophysicsen_US
dc.subjectMeteorology & atmospheric sciencesen_US
dc.subjectGiant pulsationsen_US
dc.subjectSolar-winden_US
dc.subjectMass densityen_US
dc.subjectPC-5 waveen_US
dc.subjectPoweren_US
dc.subjectSpacecraften_US
dc.subjectSignalsen_US
dc.subjectFluxen_US
dc.subjectAstronomical and space sciencesen_US
dc.titleFirst results from sonification and exploratory citizen science of magnetospheric ULF waves: long-lasting decreasing-frequency poloidal field line resonance following geomagnetic stormsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2018SW001988
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv414636


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