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dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-16T17:07:40Z
dc.date.available2020-01-16T17:07:40Z
dc.date.issued2020-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39103
dc.description.abstractSince the 1980s, globalization has generated a network of key cities that organize and manage global markets. The leading activity of global capitalism has become the financial and advanced professional services that manage the evolving knowledge economy. Numerous public and private entities have been publishing studies that analyze the characteristics of global cities and rank them against the competition. Boston ranks relatively high in many global city ranking studies. Although it is not in the top tier of cities managing the capitalist economy, cities like New York, London, and Tokyo, it is a leader in technological and life sciences innovation, building upon its world-class universities and research institutions and its long-established financial sector. Global cities benchmark reports also indicate performance related to social equity. In this regard, Boston ranks high in economic inequality, indicating the need for policy solutions related to this issue.en_US
dc.publisherBoston University Initiative on Cities Working Paper Seriesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBoston University Initiative on Cities Working Paper Series; #000A1
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 James O'Connell All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.subjectGlobal citiesen_US
dc.subjectCity rankingsen_US
dc.subjectEconomic competitivenessen_US
dc.subjectInnovationen_US
dc.subjectBostonen_US
dc.titleWhat makes Boston a "Global" city?en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US


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