Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBelghasem, Mostafa E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorA'amar, Ousamaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoth, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Joshuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorArinze, Nkirukaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Sean M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Jean M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSalant, David J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChitalia, Vipul C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBigio, Irving J.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2019-04-25
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-29T15:12:30Z
dc.date.available2020-01-29T15:12:30Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-09
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31073168
dc.identifier.citationMostafa E Belghasem, Ousama A'amar, Daniel Roth, Joshua Walker, Nkiruka Arinze, Sean M Richards, Jean M Francis, David J Salant, Vipul C Chitalia, Irving J Bigio. 2019. "Towards minimally-invasive, quantitative assessment of chronic kidney disease using optical spectroscopy.." Sci Rep, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp. 7168 - ?. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-43684-8
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39198
dc.description.abstractThe universal pathologic features implicated in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA). Current methods of estimating IFTA are slow, labor-intensive and fraught with variability and sampling error, and are not quantitative. As such, there is pressing clinical need for a less-invasive and faster method that can quantitatively assess the degree of IFTA. We propose a minimally-invasive optical method to assess the macro-architecture of kidney tissue, as an objective, quantitative assessment of IFTA, as an indicator of the degree of kidney disease. The method of elastic-scattering spectroscopy (ESS) measures backscattered light over the spectral range 320-900 nm and is highly sensitive to micromorphological changes in tissues. Using two discrete mouse models of CKD, we observed spectral trends of increased scattering intensity in the near-UV to short-visible region (350-450 nm), relative to longer wavelengths, for fibrotic kidneys compared to normal kidney, with a quasi-linear correlation between the ESS changes and the histopathology-determined degree of IFTA. These results suggest the potential of ESS as an objective, quantitative and faster assessment of IFTA for the management of CKD patients and in the allocation of organs for kidney transplantation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipT32 HL007224 - NHLBI NIH HHS; R01CA175382 - U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | National Institutes of Health (NIH); T32 GM86308 - U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | National Institutes of Health (NIH); R01 CA175382 - NCI NIH HHS; 1UL1TR001430 - U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | National Institutes of Health (NIH); NIH R01HL132325 - U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | National Institutes of Health (NIH); T32 HL007224-40 - U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | National Institutes of Health (NIH); T32 GM086308 - NIGMS NIH HHS; R01 HL132325 - NHLBI NIH HHS; R01HL132325 - U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | National Institutes of Health (NIH); UL1 TR001430 - NCATS NIH HHSen_US
dc.format.extentp. 7168en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSci Rep
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectBiochemistry and cell biologyen_US
dc.subjectOther physical sciencesen_US
dc.titleTowards minimally-invasive, quantitative assessment of chronic kidney disease using optical spectroscopyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-019-43684-8
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Medicineen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4168-1466 (Bigio, Irving J)
dc.identifier.mycv475336


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.