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dc.contributor.authorHatchadorian, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBest, Roben_US
dc.contributor.authorWholey, Katieen_US
dc.contributor.authorCalven, Alexandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorLevine, Ericaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTepfer, Saraen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwett, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Michael J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPollack, Adamen_US
dc.contributor.authorPerez, Tayloren_US
dc.contributor.authorCastigliego, Joshua R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCleveland, Cutler J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-30T19:53:15Z
dc.date.available2020-01-30T19:53:15Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-15
dc.identifierhttp://sites.bu.edu/cfb/files/2019/06/CFB_Buildings_Technical_Report_061719.pdf
dc.identifier.citationHatchadorian, Rebecca, Rob Best, Katie Wholey, Alexandra Calven, Erica Levine, Sara Tepfer, Brian Swett, Michael J. Walsh, Adam Pollack, Taylor Perez, Joshua R. Castigliego, and Cutler J. Cleveland. 2019. Carbon Free Boston: Buildings Technical Report (Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy, Boston, MA, USA). Available at http://sites.bu.edu/cfb/technical-reports.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39213
dc.descriptionPart of a series of reports that includes: Carbon Free Boston: Summary Report; Carbon Free Boston: Social Equity Report; Carbon Free Boston: Technical Summary; Carbon Free Boston: Transportation Technical Report; Carbon Free Boston: Waste Technical Report; Carbon Free Boston: Energy Technical Report; Carbon Free Boston: Offsets Technical Report; Available at http://sites.bu.edu/cfb/en_US
dc.description.abstractOVERVIEW: Boston is known for its historic iconic buildings, from the Paul Revere House in the North End, to City Hall in Government Center, to the Old South Meeting House in Downtown Crossing, to the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill, to 200 Clarendon (the Hancock Tower) in Back Bay, to Abbotsford in Roxbury. In total, there are over 86,000 buildings that comprise more than 647 million square feet of area. Most of these buildings will still be in use in 2050. Floorspace (square footage) is almost evenly split between residential and non-residential uses, but residential buildings account for nearly 80,000 (93 percent) of the 86,000 buildings. Boston’s buildings are used for a diverse range of activities that include homes, offices, hospitals, factories, laboratories, schools, public service, retail, hotels, restaurants, and convention space. Building type strongly influences energy use; for example, restaurants, hospitals, and laboratories have high energy demands compared to other commercial uses. Boston’s building stock is characterized by thousands of turn-of-the-20th century homes and a postWorld War II building boom that expanded both residential buildings and commercial space. Boston is in the midst of another boom in building construction that is transforming neighborhoods across the city. [TRUNCATED]en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCarbon Free Boston Technical Reports
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 by the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy. This work and its associated results are made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectCarbon Free Bostonen_US
dc.subjectBuildings sectoren_US
dc.subjectUrbanen_US
dc.subjectCitiesen_US
dc.subjectBostonen_US
dc.subjectBoston Universityen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectUrban energy modelen_US
dc.titleCarbon Free Boston: Buildings Technical Reporten_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Earth & Environmenten_US
dc.identifier.mycv482425


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Copyright © 2019 by the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy.
This work and its associated results are made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2019 by the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy. This work and its associated results are made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.