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dc.contributor.authorPorter, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorMilkovits, Martinen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, Xiao Yun (Jane)en_US
dc.contributor.authorBoone, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Michael J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCastigliego, Joshua R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCleveland, Cutler J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-30T20:07:28Z
dc.date.available2020-01-30T20:07:28Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-15
dc.identifier.citationPorter, Christopher, Martin Milkovits, Xiao Yun (Jane) Chang, Scott Boone, Michael J. Walsh, Joshua R. Castigliego, and Cutler J. Cleveland. 2019. Carbon Free Boston: Transportation Technical Report (Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy, Boston, MA, USA). Available at http://sites.bu.edu/cfb/technical-reports.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39214
dc.descriptionPart of a series of reports that includes: Carbon Free Boston: Summary Report; Carbon Free Boston: Social Equity Report; Carbon Free Boston: Technical Summary; Carbon Free Boston: Buildings Technical Report; Carbon Free Boston: Waste Technical Report; Carbon Free Boston: Energy Technical Report; Carbon Free Boston: Offsets Technical Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractOVERVIEW: Transportation connects Boston’s workers, residents and tourists to their livelihoods, health care, education, recreation, culture, and other aspects of life quality. In cities, transit access is a critical factor determining upward mobility. Yet many urban transportation systems, including Boston’s, underserve some populations along one or more of those dimensions. Boston has the opportunity and means to expand mobility access to all residents, and at the same time reduce GHG emissions from transportation. This requires the transformation of the automobile-centric system that is fueled predominantly by gasoline and diesel fuel. The near elimination of fossil fuels—combined with more transit, walking, and biking—will curtail air pollution and crashes, and dramatically reduce the public health impact of transportation. The City embarks on this transition from a position of strength. Boston is consistently ranked as one of the most walkable and bikeable cities in the nation, and one in three commuters already take public transportation. There are three general strategies to reaching a carbon-neutral transportation system: • Shift trips out of automobiles to transit, biking, and walking;1 • Reduce automobile trips via land use planning that encourages denser development and affordable housing in transit-rich neighborhoods; • Shift most automobiles, trucks, buses, and trains to zero-GHG electricity. Even with Boston’s strong transit foundation, a carbon-neutral transportation system requires a wholesale change in Boston’s transportation culture. Success depends on the intelligent adoption of new technologies, influencing behavior with strong, equitable, and clearly articulated planning and investment, and effective collaboration with state and regional partners.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCarbon Free Boston Technical Reports
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 by the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy. This work and its associated results are made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectTransportationen_US
dc.subjectCarbon Free Bostonen_US
dc.subjectBostonen_US
dc.subjectTransportation systemen_US
dc.subjectTransportation sectoren_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectCarbon neutralityen_US
dc.titleCarbon Free Boston: Transportation Technical Reporten_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Earth & Environmenten_US
dc.identifier.mycv482426


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Copyright © 2019 by the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy.
This work and its associated results are made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2019 by the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy. This work and its associated results are made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.