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dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Maneka Deannaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrankel, Katherine K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-03T14:42:30Z
dc.date.available2020-02-03T14:42:30Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000452703100005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationManeka Deanna Brooks, Katherine K Frankel. 2018. "Oral reading: practices and purposes in secondary classrooms." ENGLISH TEACHING-PRACTICE AND CRITIQUE, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp. 328 - 341. https://doi.org/10.1108/ETPC-01-2018-0010
dc.identifier.issn1175-8708
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39231
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE This paper aims to investigate teacher-initiated whole-group oral reading practices in two ninth-grade reading intervention classrooms and how teachers understood the purposes of those practices. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH In this qualitative cross-case analysis, a literacy-as-social-practice perspective is used to collaboratively analyze ethnographic data (fieldnotes, audio recordings, interviews, artifacts) across two classrooms. FINDINGS Oral reading was a routine instructional reading event in both classrooms. However, the literacy practices that characterized oral reading and teachers’ purposes for using oral reading varied depending on teachers’ pedagogical philosophies, instructional goals and contextual constraints. During oral reading, students’ opportunities to engage in independent meaning making with texts were either absent or secondary to other purposes or goals. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS Findings emphasize the significance of understanding both how and why oral reading happens in secondary classrooms. Specifically, they point to the importance of collaborating with teachers to (a) examine their own ideas about the power of oral reading and the institutional factors that shape their existing oral reading practices; (b) investigate the intended and actual outcomes of oral reading for their students and (c) develop other instructional approaches to support students to individually and collaboratively make meaning from texts. ORIGINALITY/VALUE This study falls at the intersection of three under-researched areas of study: the nature of everyday instruction in secondary literacy intervention settings, the persistence of oral reading in secondary school and teachers’ purposes for using oral reading in their instruction. Consequently, it contributes new knowledge that can support educators in creating more equitable instructional environments.en_US
dc.format.extent328 - 341en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEMERALD GROUP PUBLISHING LTDen_US
dc.relation.ispartofENGLISH TEACHING-PRACTICE AND CRITIQUE
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectEducation & educational researchen_US
dc.subjectLinguisticsen_US
dc.subjectLanguage & linguisticsen_US
dc.subjectCase studyen_US
dc.subjectLiteracy teachingen_US
dc.subjectAdolescent literacyen_US
dc.subjectLiteracy practicesen_US
dc.subjectReading interventionen_US
dc.subjectOral readingen_US
dc.subjectReading alouden_US
dc.subjectCurriculum and pedagogyen_US
dc.titleOral reading: practices and purposes in secondary classroomsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/ETPC-01-2018-0010
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, Wheelock College of Education & Human Developmenten_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv414718


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