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dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Gretchen O.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarlow, David H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCronin-Golomb, Aliceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T21:06:31Z
dc.date.available2020-02-04T21:06:31Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationG.O. Reynolds, D.H. Barlow, A. Cronin-Golomb. 2016. "The potential of cognitive-behavioral intervention for anxiety in Parkinson's disease." Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, Volume 22, pp. e73 - e74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2015.10.171
dc.identifier.issn1353-8020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39261
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Anxiety is a prevalent but understudied non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD), for which pharmacological treatments yield mixed results. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has shown promise in improving depression in PD, and case studies suggest that it may also alleviate anxiety. Because of the deleterious effects of anxiety on cognition and quality of life, there is need for evidence-based psychological interventions. METHODS: This study explores the utility and feasibility of a transdiagnostic intervention to improve anxiety in PD using a multiple-baseline, single-case experimental design. Following a two-, four-, or six-week baseline phase, five individuals with PD who met DSM-5 criteria for an anxiety disorder received/are receiving 12 weekly sessions of CBT1, followed by a post-intervention assessment and a 6-week no-contact follow-up. Weekly levels of anxiety and depression are measured throughout the study, with measures of cognition, quality of life, sleep, and motor function completed at all pre- and post-intervention assessments. RESULTS: Results to date (2 completers, 3 currently enrolled) suggest that CBT may produce clinically meaningful changes in anxiety, depression, quality of life, and fear of falling (Figure 01). Results are mixed regarding effects on cognition, sleep, and motor function. Treatment satisfaction has been high. CONCLUSIONS: CBT may improve anxiety, depression, quality of life, and fear of falling among adults with PD and clinical anxiety. These findings warrant further exploration of CBT for anxiety across various stages of PD.en_US
dc.format.extente73 - e74en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofParkinsonism & Related Disorders
dc.subjectNeurology & neurosurgeryen_US
dc.subjectClinical sciencesen_US
dc.subjectCognitive sciencesen_US
dc.subjectParkinson diseaseen_US
dc.subjectAnxietyen_US
dc.titleThe potential of cognitive-behavioral intervention for anxiety in Parkinson's diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.parkreldis.2015.10.171
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-5699-6204 (Cronin-Golomb, A)
dc.identifier.mycv116919


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