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dc.contributor.authorScott, Amy M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKnott, Cheryl D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSusanto, Tri Wahyuen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-05T15:43:27Z
dc.date.available2020-02-05T15:43:27Z
dc.date.issued2019-06
dc.identifier.citationAmy M Scott, Cheryl D Knott, Tri Wahyu Susanto. 2019. "Are Male Orangutans a Threat to Infants? Evidence of Mother–Offspring Counterstrategies to Infanticide in Bornean Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii)." International Journal of Primatology, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp. 435 - 455. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10764-019-00097-8
dc.identifier.issn0164-0291
dc.identifier.issn1573-8604
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39274
dc.description.abstractSexually selected infanticide by males is widespread in primates. Female primates employ a variety of strategies to reduce infanticide risk. While infanticide has never been directly observed in wild orangutans (Pongo spp.), their slow life history makes infants vulnerable to infanticide. The mating strategies of female orangutans include polyandrous and postconceptive mating that may serve to increase paternity confusion, an infanticide avoidance strategy. Here, we investigate whether female orangutans alter their social interactions with males as another infanticide avoidance strategy. We hypothesize that females with younger offspring avoid males and that the distance between mother and offspring decreases in the presence of males. We use long-term behavioral data collected between 1994 and 2016 from Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) in Gunung Palung National Park, Indonesia, to test whether the sexual selection hypothesis for infanticide helps explain aspects of orangutan social behavior. We found that mothers with offspring <6 yr. old both encountered fewer males and spent less time with males during social interactions than did mothers with offspring >6 yr. old and females without offspring. In addition, the distance between a mother–offspring dyad showed a statistically significant decrease in the presence of males, but not females. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that female orangutans employ strategies to reduce infanticide risk in their social interactions. Because orangutans have a high fission–fusion dynamic, they have flexibility in manipulating social interactions as a counter-infanticide strategy. Our results suggest that infanticide by males is a selective pressure shaping female orangutan social behavior.en_US
dc.format.extent435 - 455en_US
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Primatology
dc.subjectGreat apesen_US
dc.subjectMale avoidanceen_US
dc.subjectMale infanticideen_US
dc.subjectOrangutan socialityen_US
dc.subjectSexual selection hypothesisen_US
dc.subjectZoologyen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral science & comparative psychologyen_US
dc.subjectPongo pygmaeus wurmbiien_US
dc.subjectBornean orangutansen_US
dc.titleAre male orangutans a threat to infants? Evidence of mother-offspring counter strategies to infanticide in Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10764-019-00097-8
pubs.elements-sourcecrossrefen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Anthropologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.date.online2019-07-17
dc.identifier.mycv484058


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