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dc.contributor.authorMagnain, Carolineen_US
dc.contributor.authorAugustinack, Jean C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTirrell, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.authorFogarty, Morganen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrosch, Matthew P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBoas, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorFischl, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.authorRockland, Kathleen S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-05T16:15:14Z
dc.date.available2020-02-05T16:15:14Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.citationCaroline Magnain, Jean C Augustinack, Lee Tirrell, Morgan Fogarty, Matthew P Frosch, David Boas, Bruce Fischl, Kathleen S Rockland. 2019. "Colocalization of neurons in optical coherence microscopy and Nissl-stained histology in Brodmann’s area 32 and area 21." Brain Structure and Function, Volume 224, Issue 1, pp. 351 - 362. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00429-018-1777-z
dc.identifier.issn1863-2653
dc.identifier.issn1863-2661
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39279
dc.descriptionPublished in final edited form as: Brain Struct Funct. 2019 January ; 224(1): 351–362. doi:10.1007/s00429-018-1777-z.en_US
dc.description.abstractOptical coherence tomography is an optical technique that uses backscattered light to highlight intrinsic structure, and when applied to brain tissue, it can resolve cortical layers and fiber bundles. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is higher resolution (i.e., 1.25 µm) and is capable of detecting neurons. In a previous report, we compared the correspondence of OCM acquired imaging of neurons with traditional Nissl stained histology in entorhinal cortex layer II. In the current method-oriented study, we aimed to determine the colocalization success rate between OCM and Nissl in other brain cortical areas with different laminar arrangements and cell packing density. We focused on two additional cortical areas: medial prefrontal, pre-genual Brodmann area (BA) 32 and lateral temporal BA 21. We present the data as colocalization matrices and as quantitative percentages. The overall average colocalization in OCM compared to Nissl was 67% for BA 32 (47% for Nissl colocalization) and 60% for BA 21 (52% for Nissl colocalization), but with a large variability across cases and layers. One source of variability and confounds could be ascribed to an obscuring effect from large and dense intracortical fiber bundles. Other technical challenges, including obstacles inherent to human brain tissue, are discussed. Despite limitations, OCM is a promising semi-high throughput tool for demonstrating detail at the neuronal level, and, with further development, has distinct potential for the automatic acquisition of large databases as are required for the human brain.en_US
dc.format.extent351 - 362en_US
dc.languageen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Structure and Function
dc.subjectMedical physiologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectCognitive sciencesen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental biologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurology & neurosurgeryen_US
dc.subjectOptical imagingen_US
dc.subjectHuman brainen_US
dc.subjectIsocortexen_US
dc.subjectLimbicen_US
dc.subjectNeuronen_US
dc.subjectTissueen_US
dc.subjectValidationen_US
dc.subjectNeurobiologyen_US
dc.titleColocalization of neurons in optical coherence microscopy and Nissl-stained histology in Brodmann’s area 32 and area 21en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00429-018-1777-z
pubs.elements-sourcecrossrefen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Medicineen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.date.online2018-10-17
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-6709-7711 (Boas, David)
dc.identifier.mycv467527


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