Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Yuqien_US
dc.contributor.authorReinhart, Robert M.G.en_US
dc.date2018-02-14
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-12T21:14:00Z
dc.date.available2020-02-12T21:14:00Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-17
dc.identifier.citationJ. Nguyen, Y. Deng, R. Reinhart. 2018. "Brain-state determines learning improvements after transcranial alternating-current stimulation to frontal cortex." Brain Stimulation, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp. 723 - 726. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2018.02.008
dc.identifier.issn1935-861X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39365
dc.descriptionPublished in final edited form as: Brain Stimul. 2018 ; 11(4): 723–726. doi:10.1016/j.brs.2018.02.008en_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Theories of executive control propose that communication between medial frontal cortex (MFC) and lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC) is critical for learning. 6-Hz phase synchronization may be the mechanism by which neural activity between MFC and lPFC is coordinated into a functional network. Recent evidence suggests that switching from eyes closed to open may induce a change in brain-state reflected by enhanced executive control and related functional connectivity. OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIs To examine whether causal manipulation of MFC and lPFC can improve learning according to the brain-state induced by switching from eyes closed to open. METHODS Within-subjects, sham-controlled, double-blind study of 30 healthy subjects, each receiving 6-Hz in-phase high definition transcranial alternating-current stimulation (HD-tACS) applied to MFC and right lPFC prior to performing a time estimation task. RESULTS HD-tACS with eyes open improved learning ability relative to sham, whereas HD-tACS with eyes closed had no significant effect on behavior. CONCLUSION Results suggest a phase-sensitive mechanism in frontal cortex mediates components of learning performance in a state-dependent manner.en_US
dc.format.extent723 - 726en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Stimulation
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectClinical neurologyen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences & neurologyen_US
dc.subjectTranscranial alternating-current stimulationen_US
dc.subjectLearningen_US
dc.subjectMedial frontal cortexen_US
dc.subjectLateral prefrontal cortexen_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectEye movementsen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectFrontal lobeen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectLearningen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectTranscranial direct current stimulationen_US
dc.subjectMedical and health sciencesen_US
dc.subjectNeurology & neurosurgeryen_US
dc.titleBrain-state determines learning improvements after transcranial alternating-current stimulation to frontal cortexen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brs.2018.02.008
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv286765


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record