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dc.contributor.authorReinhart, Robert M.G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCosman, Josh D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFukuda, Keisukeen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodman, Geoffrey F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-13T15:27:39Z
dc.date.available2020-02-13T15:27:39Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000391476400001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationR.M.G. Reinhart, J.D. Cosman, K. Fukuda, G.F. Woodman. 2017. "Using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) to understand cognitive processing." Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics, Volume 79, Issue 1, pp. 3 - 23. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-016-1224-2
dc.identifier.issn0031-5117
dc.identifier.issn1943-393X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39374
dc.description.abstractNoninvasive brain stimulation methods are becoming increasingly common tools in the kit of the cognitive scientist. In particular, transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) is showing great promise as a tool to causally manipulate the brain and understand how information is processed. The popularity of this method of brain stimulation is based on the fact that it is safe, inexpensive, its effects are long lasting, and you can increase the likelihood that neurons will fire near one electrode and decrease the likelihood that neurons will fire near another. However, this method of manipulating the brain to draw causal inferences is not without complication. Because tDCS methods continue to be refined and are not yet standardized, there are reports in the literature that show some striking inconsistencies. Primary among the complications of the technique is that the tDCS method uses two or more electrodes to pass current and all of these electrodes will have effects on the tissue underneath them. In this tutorial, we will share what we have learned about using tDCS to manipulate how the brain perceives, attends, remembers, and responds to information from our environment. Our goal is to provide a starting point for new users of tDCS and spur discussion of the standardization of methods to enhance replicability.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors declare that they had no conflicts of interest with respect to their authorship or the publication of this article. This work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R01-EY019882, R01-EY025272, P30-EY08126, F31-MH102042, and T32-EY007135). (R01-EY019882 - National Institutes of Health; R01-EY025272 - National Institutes of Health; P30-EY08126 - National Institutes of Health; F31-MH102042 - National Institutes of Health; T32-EY007135 - National Institutes of Health)en_US
dc.format.extent3 - 23en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPsychonomic Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAttention, Perception, and Psychophysics
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, experimentalen_US
dc.subjectCognitive neuroscienceen_US
dc.subjectMethods: Direct brain stimulationen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectTranscranial direct current stimulationen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive sciencesen_US
dc.titleUsing transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) to understand cognitive processingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/s13414-016-1224-2
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv185257


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