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dc.contributor.authorReinhart, Robert M.G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Wenxien_US
dc.contributor.authorMcClenahan, Laura J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodman, Geoffrey F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-13T15:36:53Z
dc.date.available2020-02-13T15:36:53Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-25
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000384799600026&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationRobert MG Reinhart, Wenxi Xiao, Laura J McClenahan, Geoffrey F Woodman. 2016. "Electrical Stimulation of Visual Cortex Can Immediately Improve Spatial Vision." Current Biology, Volume 26, Issue 14, pp. 1867 - 1872 (6). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.05.019
dc.identifier.issn0960-9822
dc.identifier.issn1879-0445
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39375
dc.descriptionPublished in final edited form as:Curr Biol. 2016 July 25; 26(14): 1867–1872. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2016.05.019.en_US
dc.description.abstractSUMMARY We can improve human vision by correcting the optics of our lenses [1, 2, 3]. However, after the eye transduces the light, visual cortex has its own limitations that are challenging to correct [4]. Overcoming these limitations has typically involved innovative training regimes that improve vision across many days [5, 6]. In the present study, we wanted to determine whether it is possible to immediately improve the precision of spatial vision with noninvasive direct-current stimulation. Previous work suggested that visual processing could be modulated with such stimulation [7, 8, 9]. However, the short duration and variability of such effects made it seem unlikely that spatial vision could be improved for more than several minutes [7, 10]. Here we show that visual acuity in the parafoveal belt can be immediately improved by delivering noninvasive direct current to visual cortex. Twenty minutes of anodal stimulation improved subjects’ vernier acuity by approximately 15% and increased the amplitude of the earliest visually evoked potentials in lockstep with the behavioral effects. When we reversed the orientation of the electric field, we impaired resolution and reduced the amplitude of visually evoked potentials. Next, we found that anodal stimulation improved acuity enough to be measurable with the relatively coarse Snellen test and that subjects with the poorest acuity benefited the most from stimulation. Finally, we found that stimulation-induced acuity improvements were accompanied by changes in contrast sensitivity at high spatial frequencies.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grants from the NIH (R01-EY019882, R01-EY025275, P30-EY08126, T32-EY007135, F31-MH102042). We thank the reviewers and Randolph Blake for helpful comments. We thank Kevin Dieter for technical assistance in designing the psychophysical procedure for experiment 5. Subjects gave informed written consent to procedures approved by the Vanderbilt University Institutional Review Board and were compensated at a rate of $10/hr for their time. (R01-EY019882 - NIH; R01-EY025275 - NIH; P30-EY08126 - NIH; T32-EY007135 - NIH; F31-MH102042 - NIH)en_US
dc.format.extent1867 - 1872en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherCELL PRESSen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCURRENT BIOLOGY
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectBiochemistry & molecular biologyen_US
dc.subjectCell biologyen_US
dc.subjectDirect-current stimulationen_US
dc.subjectElectrophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectSpatial visionen_US
dc.subjectVisual acuityen_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectContrast sensitivityen_US
dc.subjectElectric stimulationen_US
dc.subjectEvoked potentials, visualen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectVision, ocularen_US
dc.subjectVisual acuityen_US
dc.subjectVisual cortexen_US
dc.subjectYoung adulten_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental biologyen_US
dc.subjectBiological sciencesen_US
dc.subjectMedical and health sciencesen_US
dc.subjectPsychology and cognitive sciencesen_US
dc.titleElectrical stimulation of visual cortex can immediately improve spatial visionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cub.2016.05.019
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciencesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv185258


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