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dc.contributor.authorKarra, Maheshen_US
dc.contributor.authorFink, Güntheren_US
dc.coverage.spatialEnglanden_US
dc.date2019-06-19
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-18T20:06:31Z
dc.date.available2020-02-18T20:06:31Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-04
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31272440
dc.identifier.citationMahesh Karra, Günther Fink. 2019. "Long run height and education implications of early life growth faltering: a synthetic panel analysis of 425 birth cohorts in 21 low- and middle-income countries.." BMC Public Health, Volume 19, Issue 1, 876. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-7203-5
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39441
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We estimated the associations between exposure to early life growth faltering at the population level and adult height and education outcomes in a sample of 21 low- and middle-income countries. METHODS: We conducted a synthetic panel analysis of 425 birth cohorts across 126 regions in 21 LMICs surveyed in the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) both as children and as adults. Data from historic (1987-1993) DHS survey rounds were used to compute average height-for-age z-scores at the province-birth-year level. Cohort measures of early life growth were then linked to adult height and educational attainment measures collected on individuals from the same cohorts in the 2006-2014 DHS survey rounds. The primary exposure of interest was population-level early life growth (region-birth year average HAZ) and growth faltering (region-birth year stunting prevalence). Multivariable linear regression models were used to estimate the associations between adult outcomes and population-level measures of early life linear growth. RESULTS: The average cohort height-for-age z-score (HAZ) in childhood was - 1.53 [range: - 2.73, - 0.348]. In fully adjusted models, each unit increase in cohort childhood HAZ was associated with a 2.0 cm [95% CI: 1.09-2.9] increase in adult height, with larger associations for men than for women. Evidence for the association between early childhood height and adult educational attainment was found to be inconclusive (0.269, 95% CI: [- 0.68-1.22]). CONCLUSIONS: While early childhood linear growth at the cohort level appears to be highly predictive of adult height, the empirical association between early life growth and adult educational attainment seems weak and heterogeneous across countries. REGISTRATION: This study was registered on May 10, 2017 at the ISRCTN Registry ( http://www.isrctn.com ), registration number ISRCTN82438662 .en_US
dc.languageeng
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Health
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2019 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAdult heighten_US
dc.subjectChild stuntingen_US
dc.subjectDemographic and health surveysen_US
dc.subjectEducational attainmenten_US
dc.subjectHeight-for-ageen_US
dc.subjectLow- and middle-income countriesen_US
dc.subjectAcademic successen_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectBody heighten_US
dc.subjectChild, preschoolen_US
dc.subjectCohort studiesen_US
dc.subjectDeveloping countriesen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectGrowth disordersen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectInfanten_US
dc.subjectInfant, newbornen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectSurveys and questionnairesen_US
dc.subjectPublic healthen_US
dc.subjectPublic health and health servicesen_US
dc.titleLong run height and education implications of early life growth faltering: a synthetic panel analysis of 425 birth cohorts in 21 low- and middle-income countriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished version and Accepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-019-7203-5
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studiesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-0962-092X (Karra, Mahesh)
dc.identifier.mycv478079


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© The Author(s). 2019 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to
the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver
(http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s). 2019 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.