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dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Meganen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-25T14:08:38Z
dc.date.available2020-02-25T14:08:38Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-01
dc.identifier.citationMegan Sullivan. 2018. "How Can Research on Children of Incarcerated Parents in the United States Alter Corrections Practice?." Advancing Corrections: Journal of the International Corrections and Prisons Association, Volume 5, Issue 2018, pp. 90 - 100.
dc.identifier.issn2517-9233
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39502
dc.description.abstractThe upsurge in people incarcerated in the United States since the late 1970s has meant that many people in prison and jail are parents. Currently 2.7 million children in the United States have incarcerated parents, and more than 10 million children have had an incarcerated parent (Johnston 2010). Given these numbers, researchers began to examine how a parent’s imprisonment impacted a child’s growth and development. The history of this research and researchers’ findings can be useful to the corrections community. While much of the information below is specific to the United States, this article also has implications for children internationally.en_US
dc.format.extent90 - 100 (10)en_US
dc.publisherInternational Corrections and Prisons Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAdvancing Corrections: Journal of the International Corrections and Prisons Association
dc.titleHow can research on children of incarcerated parents in the United States alter corrections practice?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of General Studiesen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-5052-0731 (Sullivan, Megan)
dc.identifier.mycv416585


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