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dc.contributor.authorAsvanund, Chanavuten_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-04T16:35:47Z
dc.date.available2020-03-04T16:35:47Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.date.submitted1998
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)41949817
dc.identifier.otherb22455450
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39645
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Sc.D.)--Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 1998 (Prosthodontics).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references: (leaves 87-93).en_US
dc.description.abstractStatement of problem. Previous studies have shown varying degrees of discoloration of resin-based restorative materials as a result of environmental exposure. Purpose. This in vitro study compared color stability of a new resin-interpenetrating phase ceramic (RIPC) material with other tooth-colored dental restorative materials when subjected to four different experimental conditions. Material and methods. Twenty specimens were made each of the following materials: RIPC material, Vitabloc Mark II ceramic block, composite resin and acrylic resin. The 20 samples for each material were randomly assigned to four groups. One group was tested in distilled water, one in a coffee solution, one was thermocycled, and one subjected to ultraviolet irradiation. Color measurements were performed before the experiment, after 10 days and after 15 days for all groups. Color measurements were also performed after 2500 cycles of thermocycling in group four. Results: The RIPC material remained color stable under all experimental conditions. The recorded color stability of the RIPC specimens was comparable to that of the Mark II ceramic specimens. Color stability was also superior to composite resin and acrylic resin specimens. Conclusions. Base on the results of this in vitro study the following conclusions were drawn. 1) RIPC recorded color stability comparable to Mark II ceramic blocks. The discoloration was minimal and considered unnoticeable clinically. 2) RIPC remained color stable throughout the experiment, while the duration of exposure to experimental conditions had the most effect on acrylic resin. 3) Thermocycling changed the color of composite resin the most, but did not increase susceptibility to staining by a coffee solution. 4) Each material responded to each test differently. Clinical significance. The results of this study would suggest that the RIPC ceramic block is extremely color stable, and comparable to the commercially available Mark II ceramic block.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectAcrylic resinsen_US
dc.subjectCeramicsen_US
dc.subjectColoren_US
dc.subjectDental restoration, permanenten_US
dc.titleColor stability and color development of resin-interpenetrating phase ceramicen_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science in Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineProsthodonticsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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