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dc.contributor.authorEmamieh, Mohammaden_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-04T16:36:20Z
dc.date.available2020-03-04T16:36:20Z
dc.date.issued1980
dc.date.submitted1980
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)8925401
dc.identifier.otherb14399349
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39650
dc.descriptionPLEASE NOTE: This work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community: please click Download and log in with a valid BU account to access. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Sc.D.)--Boston University, Henry M. Goldman School of Graduate Dentistry, 1980 (Prosthetics)en_US
dc.descriptionBibliography: leaves 68-72.en_US
dc.description.abstractCements in dentistry are used for various purposes such as luting agents, cement bases,cementing of orthodontic brackets,etc., etc. Solubility of cement is usually tested by means of storage in distilled water. This passive system by no means resembles the dynamic environment of the oral cavity. A hypothesis was made that an active dynamic erosion system could effect solubility and disintegration of cements at an accelerated rate, compared to storage in distilled water. The objective of this study was to investigate the previously mentioned claim. Stainless steel sample holders were prepared in which four groups of commonly used cements were tested. The four groups were as follows: Cyanoacrylate cement, Glass-ionomer cement, Zinc phosphate cement and Silicate cement. The samples were either stored in distilled water or exposed to running water in a specially designed dripping apparatus. Periodically samples were weighed using a microbalance, which was accurately 3 decimals. After a test period of 45 days, they were removed from the apparatus or solution and allowed to dehydrate. The data was tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis. The results indicate that no statistical significant difference existed between the experimental method versus storage in distilled water. Cements behaved somewhat differently within one test group. A statistical significant difference was noted between the cements in the distilled water group only.(P 0.01) It can be concluded from this experiment that the experimental method does not yield a statistically significant accelerated dissolution or disintegration of dental cements and, therefore, storage of samples in distilled water, at the present time, seems to be the most practical method of testing dental cements.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBoston Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis work is protected by copyright. Downloading is restricted to the BU community. If you are the author of this work and would like to make it publicly available, please contact open-help@bu.edu.en_US
dc.subjectDental cementsen_US
dc.titleSolubility and disintegration of cements :en_US
dc.typeThesis/Dissertationen_US
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science in Dentistryen_US
etd.degree.levelmastersen_US
etd.degree.disciplineProstheticsen_US
etd.degree.grantorBoston Universityen_US


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