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dc.creatorAhmad, Imad-ad-Deanen_US
dc.date2000-01-01
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-21T19:53:18Z
dc.date.available2012-08-21T19:53:18Z
dc.date.issued2012-08-21
dc.identifierhttp://digilib.bu.edu/journals/ojs/index.php/jfse/article/view/74
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/3968
dc.descriptionThe author suggests that the rise of modern science was not a revolutionary development confined to modern Europe, hut an evolutionary process that began in the Islamic civilization. He reviews those elements of the Islamic religious outlook that appear to have transformed science from the deductive methodology of the ancient Greeks to the inductive approach of tnodernity. Finally, he suggests that the supposed inherent tension between religion and science is a consequence of the sudden exposure of medieval European culture to the \"new\" scientific paradigm that had evolved in the Muslim World.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherBoston Theological Instituteen_US
dc.relationhttp://digilib.bu.edu/journals/ojs/index.php/jfse/article/view/74/74
dc.sourceJournal of Faith and Science Exchange; Journal of Faith and Science Exchange, Vol. 4en_US
dc.titleIslamic Contributions to Modern Scientific Methodsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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