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dc.contributor.authorRosenzweig, Melissa S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMarston, John M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-23T14:04:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationMelissa Rosenzweig, John M Marston. 2017. "Archaeologies of empire and environment." Society for American Archaeology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaa.2018.08.004
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/39799
dc.descriptionThis work is permanently embargoed in OpenBU. No public access is forecasted for this item. To request private access, please click on the locked Download file link and fill out the appropriate web form.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper promotes an explicit study of archaeologies of empire and environment, and advances theories and methods in environmental archaeology that demonstrate that environmental practices articulate people's relationships to imperial authority. While many studies of empire take for granted that centralized organization and surplus production lead to political control and social inequity, in the papers assembled for this special issue, the very relationship between human-environment interactions and political power becomes the object of study. In this introduction, we review established archaeological approaches to empire, explain how environmental frameworks productively recast our understandings of imperialism, and proffer a number of avenues for continued research on the subject, including those provided by the articles in this issue. We present three over-arching themes for the study of empire and environment—scale, legacy, and resilience and resistance—and discuss their implementation with the papers that follow. Ultimately, we argue that imperialism entails the management of heterogeneous peoples and environments, and therefore, archaeologies of empire require the integrated study of humans, landscapes, and biota.en_US
dc.format.extent42 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Anthropological Archaeology
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen_US
dc.subjectLife sciences & biomedicineen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectArchaeologyen_US
dc.subjectEmpireen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental archaeologyen_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
dc.subjectLandscapeen_US
dc.subjectPolitical economyen_US
dc.subjectPolitical ecologyen_US
dc.subjectResilienceen_US
dc.subjectResistanceen_US
dc.subjectLegacy effectsen_US
dc.subjectScaleen_US
dc.subjectNiche constructionen_US
dc.subjectResilience theoryen_US
dc.subjectGrand challengesen_US
dc.subjectWealth financeen_US
dc.subjectClimate-changeen_US
dc.subjectEvent ecologyen_US
dc.subjectCoupled humanen_US
dc.subjectLand-useen_US
dc.subjectRomanen_US
dc.subjectPolitical economyen_US
dc.titleArchaeologies of empire and environmenten_US
dc.typeConference materialsen_US
dc.description.versionFirst author draften_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jaa.2018.08.004
dc.description.embargo2030-01-01
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Indefiniteen_US
pubs.notesI do not permit non-final versions of my research articles to be disseminated, only final published versions, to avoid confusion and mis-citation.en_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Anthropologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1412-9695 (Marston, John M)
dc.identifier.mycv326571


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