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dc.contributor.authorDaaboul, George G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFreedman, David S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorScherr, Steven M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Eriken_US
dc.contributor.authorRosca, Alexandruen_US
dc.contributor.authorBernstein, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorMire, Chad E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAgans, Krystle N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoenen, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeisbert, Thomas W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorUnlu, M. Selimen_US
dc.contributor.authorConnor, John H.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-13T14:08:12Z
dc.date.available2020-04-13T14:08:12Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-26
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000404537300016&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e74115fe3da270499c3d65c9b17d654
dc.identifier.citationGeorge G Daaboul, David S Freedman, Steven M Scherr, Erik Carter, Alexandru Rosca, David Bernstein, Chad E Mire, Krystle N Agans, Thomas Hoenen, Thomas W Geisbert, M Selim Unlu, John H Connor. 2017. "Enhanced light microscopy visualization of virus particles from Zika virus to filamentous ebolaviruses." PLOS ONE, Volume 12, Issue 6, 15 pp. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0179728
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40116
dc.description.abstractLight microscopy is a powerful tool in the detection and analysis of parasites, fungi, and prokaryotes, but has been challenging to use for the detection of individual virus particles. Unlabeled virus particles are too small to be visualized using standard visible light microscopy. Characterization of virus particles is typically performed using higher resolution approaches such as electron microscopy or atomic force microscopy. These approaches require purification of virions away from their normal millieu, requiring significant levels of expertise, and can only enumerate small numbers of particles per field of view. Here, we utilize a visible light imaging approach called Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) that allows automated counting and sizing of thousands of individual virions. Virions are captured directly from complex solutions onto a silicon chip and then detected using a reflectance interference imaging modality. We show that the use of different imaging wavelengths allows the visualization of a multitude of virus particles. Using Violet/UV illumination, the SP-IRIS technique is able to detect individual flavivirus particles (~40 nm), while green light illumination is capable of identifying and discriminating between vesicular stomatitis virus and vaccinia virus (~360 nm). Strikingly, the technology allows the clear identification of filamentous infectious ebolavirus particles and virus-like particles. The ability to differentiate and quantify unlabeled virus particles extends the usefulness of traditional light microscopy and can be embodied in a straightforward benchtop approach allowing widespread applications ranging from rapid detection in biological fluids to analysis of virus-like particles for vaccine development and production.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded in part by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases through awards to John H Connor (R01Al1096159) and David S Freedman (1R43Al118254). These funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. nanoView Diagnostics Inc provided support in the form of salaries for authors [GD, DS, AR, DB] and played a role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, and prepare of the manuscript. The specific roles of these authors are articulated in the 'author contributions' section. (R01Al1096159 - National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; 1R43Al118254 - National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases)en_US
dc.format.extent15 pagesen_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLOS ONE
dc.rights© 2017 Daaboul et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectScience & technologyen_US
dc.subjectVesicular stomatitis virusen_US
dc.subjectCryoelectron tomographyen_US
dc.subjectElectron-microsopyen_US
dc.subjectInfectivityen_US
dc.subjectVirionsen_US
dc.subjectMassen_US
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectEbolavirusen_US
dc.subjectEquipment designen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMicroscopy, electron, scanningen_US
dc.subjectMicroscopy, interferenceen_US
dc.subjectMicroscopy, ultravioleten_US
dc.subjectVaccinia virusen_US
dc.subjectVesiculovirusen_US
dc.subjectZika virusen_US
dc.titleEnhanced light microscopy visualization of virus particles from Zika virus to filamentous ebolavirusesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0179728
pubs.elements-sourceweb-of-scienceen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Engineering, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineeringen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, School of Medicineen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8594-892X (Unlu, M Selim)
dc.identifier.mycv239433


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© 2017 Daaboul et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017 Daaboul et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.