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dc.contributor.authorYalonetskaya, Allaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMondragon, Albert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorElguero, Johnnyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCall, Kimberlyen_US
dc.coverage.spatialSwitzerlanden_US
dc.date2018-10-19
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-15T16:49:43Z
dc.date.available2020-04-15T16:49:43Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-22
dc.identifierhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30360387
dc.identifier.citationAlla Yalonetskaya, Albert A Mondragon, Johnny Elguero, Kimberly McCall. 2018. "I Spy in the Developing Fly a Multitude of Ways to Die". Journal of Developmental Biology, Volume 6, Issue 4, https://doi.org/10.3390/jdb6040026
dc.identifier.issn2221-3759
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40192
dc.description.abstractCell proliferation and cell death are two opposing, yet complementary fundamental processes in development. Cell proliferation provides new cells, while developmental programmed cell death adjusts cell numbers and refines structures as an organism grows. Apoptosis is the best-characterized form of programmed cell death; however, there are many other non-apoptotic forms of cell death that occur throughout development. Drosophila is an excellent model for studying these varied forms of cell death given the array of cellular, molecular, and genetic techniques available. In this review, we discuss select examples of apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell death that occur in different tissues and at different stages of Drosophila development. For example, apoptosis occurs throughout the nervous system to achieve an appropriate number of neurons. Elsewhere in the fly, non-apoptotic modes of developmental cell death are employed, such as in the elimination of larval salivary glands and midgut during metamorphosis. These and other examples discussed here demonstrate the versatility of Drosophila as a model organism for elucidating the diverse modes of programmed cell death.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipF31 GM115177 - NIGMS NIH HHS; 1F31GM115177 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; R21AG056158 - National Institute on Aging; R35 GM127338 - National Institute of General Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/2221-3759/6/4/26
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Developmental Biology
dc.rights© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution( CC BY) license.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectDrosophilaen_US
dc.subjectApoptosisen_US
dc.subjectAutophagyen_US
dc.subjectGliaen_US
dc.subjectMidguten_US
dc.subjectNeuroblasten_US
dc.subjectNon-apoptotic cell deathen_US
dc.subjectOvaryen_US
dc.subjectProgrammed cell deathen_US
dc.subjectSalivary glanden_US
dc.subjectTestisen_US
dc.titleI spy in the developing fly a multitude of ways to dieen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/jdb6040026
pubs.elements-sourcepubmeden_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: No embargoen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, Administrationen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Biologyen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublished onlineen_US
dc.identifier.mycv406050


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© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution( CC BY) license.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution( CC BY) license.