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dc.contributor.authorDestruel, Emilieen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoppock, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeaver, Daviden_US
dc.date2018-11-01
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-24T14:55:41Z
dc.date.available2020-04-24T14:55:41Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-18
dc.identifier.citationEmilie Destruel, Elizabeth Coppock, David Beaver. 2019. "It's not what you expected! The surprising nature of cleft alternatives in French and English." Frontiers in Psychology: Language Sciences, pp. 1 - 15. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01400
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2144/40332
dc.description.abstractWhile much prior literature on the meaning of clefts—such as the English form “it is X who Z-ed”—concentrates on the nature and status of the exhaustivity inference (“nobody/nothing other than X Z”), we report on experiments examining the role of the doxastic status of alternatives on the naturalness of c'est-clefts in French and it-clefts in English. Specifically, we study the hypothesis that clefts indicate a conflict with a doxastic commitment held by some discourse participant. Results from naturalness tasks suggest that clefts are improved by a property we term “contrariness” (along the lines of Zimmermann, 2008). This property has a gradient effect on felicity judgments: the more strongly interlocutors appear committed to an apparently false notion, the better it is to repudiate them with a cleft.en_US
dc.format.extentp. 1 - 15en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Psychology: Language Sciences
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 Destruel, Beaver and Coppock. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.subjectEnglishen_US
dc.subjectFrenchen_US
dc.subjectCleftsen_US
dc.subjectContrasten_US
dc.subjectExistential inferenceen_US
dc.subjectInterlocutors' expectationsen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCognitive sciencesen_US
dc.titleIt's not what you expected! The surprising nature of cleft alternatives in French and Englishen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01400
pubs.elements-sourcemanual-entryen_US
pubs.notesEmbargo: Not knownen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston Universityen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciencesen_US
pubs.organisational-groupBoston University, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Linguisticsen_US
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden_US
dc.identifier.mycv431402


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Copyright © 2019 Destruel, Beaver and Coppock. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2019 Destruel, Beaver and Coppock. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.